lift
Listen to an audio pronunciation
Listen to an audio pronunciation
Listen to an audio pronunciation
lift(
lihft
)
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1. (to pick up)
a. levantar
In his free time, he likes to play sports and lift weights.En su tiempo libre, le gusta jugar deportes y levantar pesas.
b. alzar
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
The waiter lifted the tray of food over his head.El camarero alzó la bandeja de comida por encima de su cabeza.
2.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to steal)
a. mangar
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
The thieves lifted all of our most valuable possessions.Los ladrones mangaron todas nuestras posesiones más valiosas.
b. birlar
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
The clever thief had managed to lift countless gems during his career.El ladrón listo había logrado birlar un sinfín de gemas durante su carrera.
c. plagiar (text)
It turned out whole paragraphs of his column had been lifted from a book.Resultó que párrafos enteros de su columna habían sido plagiados de un libro.
3. (to remove)
a. levantar
The president gave the order to lift the blockade.El presidente dio la orden de levantar el bloqueo.
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
4. (ride)
a. el aventón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
I'm getting a lift to the airport from my neighbor.Mi vecino me va a dar un aventón al aeropuerto.
b. el pon
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Puerto Rico
(Puerto Rico)
Hey, could you give me a lift to work?Oye, ¿me das pon al trabajo?
c.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
Do you want a lift?¿Quieres que te lleve?
Jim and Sally said they'd give us a lift to the party.Jim y Sally dijeron que nos llevarían a la fiesta.
5. (elevator) (United Kingdom)
a. el ascensor
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in the Caribbean: Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico
(Caribbean)
Regionalism used in South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela
(South America)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
The office is on the ninth floor? Let's take the lift.¿La oficina está en el noveno piso? Tomemos el ascensor.
b. el elevador
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Central America: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama
(Central America)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
Are you waiting for the lift?¿Estás esperando el elevador?
6. (psychological boost)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
The doctor's bedside manner gave the patient a real lift.La manera de ser de la doctora le levantó la moral al paciente.
The good news about the raises gave the employees a lift.La buena noticia sobre los aumentos levantó el ánimo de los empleados.
7. (raising force)
a. la sustentación
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
The wings of an airplane generate most of its lift.Las alas de un avión generan la mayor cantidad de la sustentación.
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
8. (to dissipate)
a. disiparse
When the sun came out, the fog suddenly lifted.Cuando salió el sol, la niebla se disipó de repente.
Copyright © Curiosity Media Inc.
lift
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (elevator) (United Kingdom)
a. el ascensor
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
lift attendantascensorista mf
lift shafthueco del ascensor
2. (car ride)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
to give somebody a liftllevar a alguien (en el coche) dar aventón a alguien
could you give me a lift to the station?¿puedes llevarme or acercarme a la estación?
3. (colloquial)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
that really gave me a lift!¡eso me levantó muchísimo los ánimos!
4. (aviation)
a. la sustentación
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
5. (one's head, eyes, arm)
a. levantar
he won't lift a finger to helpno moverá un dedo para ayudar
to lift somebody (up)levantar a alguien
to lift a child upcoger a un niño en brazos
6. (remove; restrictions, siege)
a. levantar
7. (colloquial)
a. afanar (take, steal)
b. birlar
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
c. volar
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
8. (colloquial)
a. detener (arrest)
b. trincar
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
9. (mist, fog)
a. disiparse
Copyright © 2006 Harrap Publishers Limited
lift [lɪft]
noun
1 (Britain) (elevator) ascensor (m); (for goods) montacargas (m)
they took the lift to the fourth floor There was a man in the lift as we went down
2 especially (Britain) (in car)
never accept lifts from strangers nunca te montes en un coche con extraños
she had accepted a lift from a man with a short, dark beard and glasses to [give] sb a lift
can I give you a lift? ¿quiere que le lleve (en coche)?; ¿quiere que le dé aventón?; (Méx) ¿quiere que le dé un aventón?; (Col) she gave me a lift home me llevó a casa en coche; me acompañó con su coche a casa
try and get a lift with them I can give you a lift to Burgos he gave her a lift back to London that night... he often gave me a lift home can you give me a lift to the station? children should be taught not to accept lifts from strangers to [hitch] a lift he [offered] us a lift home in his car do you [want] a lift into town? Do you want a lift, Ralph?
3 (boost)
I guess I could do with a bit of a lift they were a bit depressed and needed a lift
to give sb a lift (psychologically) levantar el ánimo a algn; (physically) dar fuerzas a algn
buying a new dress gives me a lift he had a dirnk to give himself a lift my selection for the team has given me a tremendous lift It gives the worker an extraordinary psychological lift... Drink this. It's supposed to give you a lift.
4 (Aer) propulsión (f)
this persuaded Rolls that the principle was feasible and that they should develop a gas turbine for the specific function of providing lift for vertical take-off aeroplanes Superficially, the plane looked more or less conventional, but it had no horizontal tail. Instead there were two wings. The rear one was mounted on the fuselage and fixed; and of course it gave lift, whereas a conventional tailplane gives downthrust
transitive verb
1 (raise, pick up) [+cover, box, head] levantar; [+phone, receiver] descolgar; coger; (Esp) [+child] tomar en brazos; coger en brazos; (Esp) alzar; [+invalid] mover
this suitcase is too heavy for me to lift esta maleta pesa demasiado para que yo la levante
they knew how to lift great weights unaccustomed lifting of heavy weights strains the muscles she lifted the lid of the box and displayed the contents he lifted the sheet to reveal the dead man's face she lifted her skirt to reveal a black garter{ around her thigh} the Colonel lifted the phone and dialed his superior he couldn't lift her now; his arms hurt too much lifting her gently under the arms, he helped her into a sitting position you could hurt your back if you try to lift a heavy toddler Amy lifted her arm to wave goodbye He lifted his hand to ring the doorbell... She lifted her foot and squashed the wasp into the ground she lifted her head and smiled at him he tried to lift his head from the pillow {but he was too weak he lifts his foot from the accelerator the dog lifted its [leg] against a lamppost
he lifted his eyes and looked out of the window levantó or alzó la vista y miró por la ventana
he lifted the bottle [from] the tray she lifted the kettle from the stove
the wind lifted the balloon into the air el viento se llevó el globo por los aires
he lifted the lid off the pan levantó la tapadera de la olla; destapó la olla
he lifted the child onto his knee alzó or cogió al niño y lo sentó en su rodilla; (Esp)
he lifted his case onto the table he lifted the child onto the donkey's back we lifted him onto the stretcher and took him onto the ambulance to lift sb over sth
to lift sb's spirits levantar el ánimo a algn
He used his incredible sense of humour to lift my spirits A brisk walk in the fresh air can lift your spirits and dissolve a winter depression
she lifted her glass to her lips se llevó el vaso a los labios
to lift weights (Dep) hacer or levantar pesas
I've been lifting weights for a year now
she never lifts a finger to help no mueve un dedo para ayudar
"lazy so-an-so," she thought, "he never lifts a finger when I'm not here On the way back home, the travel operator takes your bag to customs and then puts it on your homeward flight. You don't have to lift a finger
to lift the lid on sth destapar algo
...the Milan magistrate who first lifted the lid on the scandal ...a film lifting the lid on the Chappaquiddick scandal ...new book which claims to lift the lid on every KGB secret you could ever want to know
2 (remove) [+restrictions, sanctions] levantar
Mr Bush said he'd never been enthusiastic about sanctions in the first place and would lift them They urged the United States to lift all controls on textile imports... He lifted the ban on the People's Party We must do everything possible to lift the siege of Sarajevo the state of emergency was [partially] lifted last June They want to lift the threshold at which extra interest is charged the bank lifted its basic home loans rate to 10.99% from 10.75% the sale of the factory lifted gross profits [to] 2,000,000 dollars they expect that this will lift the rate of inflation back to 13 per cent an operation to lift refugees from out of an area There is a restriction on the number of passengers foreign airlines /can lift from the island/ troops will be lifted [into] the region tomorrow The Apaches are designed to quickly lift soldiers and equipment to the battlefield The army lifted people off rooftops where they had climbed to escape the flooding.
3 (dig up) [+potatoes, carrots] recoger
Lift carrots on a dry day and pack them horizontally in boxes of damp sand
4 (improve) mejorar
they need to lift their game to win tienen que mejorar su juego si quieren ganar
something must be done to lift educational standards
5 (steal) [+goods, money] mangar (informal); birlar (informal); [+idea, quotation] copiar; plagiar
the article was lifted from a newspaper el artículo fue copiado or plagiado de un periódico
Uncle Harold had lifted the morning's receipts... They break into steel filing cabinets, open cupboards, or lift a briefcase from a locked car or office most of the [article] was lifted from a newspaper
intransitive verb
1 (rise) levantarse; alzarse; (LAm)
2 (raise)
a bra which lifts and separates un sujetador que realza y separa el busto
3 (disappear) [+mist, fog] disiparse; [+depression] desaparecer
his mood seemed to have lifted parecía estar de mejor humor
/the fog had lifted/ and revealed a warm, sunny day If the [depression] does not lift in a few days, come back and see me again
4 (cheer up)
his spirits lifted at the thought of seeing her se le levantaron los ánimos al pensar que iba a verla
As soon as she heard the telephone ring her spirits lifted her [heart] lifted he will be here soon, Fanny thought, her [heart] lifting
modifier
lift attendant (n) (Britain) ascensorista (m)
lift cage (n) (Britain) caja (f) de ascensor
lift operator (n) (Britain)
lift attendant See culture box in entry lift.
lift shaft (n) (Britain) caja (f) or hueco (m) del ascensor
Collins Complete Spanish Electronic Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
Word Roots
Hover on a tile to learn new words with the same root.
Examplesloading
Learn Spanish with Fluencia
Try Fluencia, the new Spanish learning program from SpanishDict.
  • Fun and interactive
  • Highly effective
  • Easy to use
  • Works on any device
Start Learning
Did this page answer your question?