fajar
Listen to an audio pronunciation
Listen to an audio pronunciation
Listen to an audio pronunciation
fajar(
fah
-
hahr
)
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to strike)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
a. to beat up
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Los matones suelen fajar a la gente por pura diversión.Bullies usually beat people up just for fun.
b. to attack
Vi cómo un hombre fajaba a dos chicos y les robaba su dinero.I saw a man attacking two boys and stealing their money.
2.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to con)
Regionalism used in Bolivia
(Bolivia)
(River Plate)
a. to rip off
En ese restaurante me fajaron por una comida que ni siquiera era muy buena.That restaurant ripped me off for a meal which wasn't even all that good.
3. (to cover with a band)
a. to put a wraparound band on
Las editoriales suelen fajar las novedades con textos publicitarios.Publishing houses often put a publicity wraparound band on their new releases.
4. (put a bandage on)
a. to bandage
La enfermera fajó la rodilla del chico.The nurse bandaged the boy's knee.
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
5.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to pet)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
a. to make out
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
Me da vergüenza ver a Julia y José fajando en público.I feel embarrassed seeing Julia and Jose making out in public.
b. to snog
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(United Kingdom)
Siempre hay un par de colegiales fajando a las puertas del colegio.There's always a couple of schoolkids snogging at the school gates.
fajarse
A reciprocal verb is a verb that indicates that two or more subjects perform an action on each other (e.g. Ellos se abrazan.).
6.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to get into a fight)
a. to fight
Dos alumnos empezaron a fajarse y la gente formó un corro para ver la pelea.Two students started to fight and people formed a circle around them to watch.
A pronominal verb always uses a reflexive pronoun. (e.g. Te ves cansado.).
7.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to get into a fight; used with "con")
a. to fight
Es delgada y bajita, pero capaz de fajarse con cualquiera.She's thin and short, but able to fight anyone.
8. (to put on a corset)
a. to put on a girdle
Dicen que la artista se faja antes de ponerse un vestido para parecer más delgada.Rumor has it that the star puts on a girdle when she wears a dress to look thinner.
9. (sports)
a. to wear a support belt
Cuando va al gimnasio, Tono siempre se faja para proteger la espalda.Tono always wears a support belt to protect his back when he goes to the gym.
10.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to touch up)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
a. to feel up
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
Pedro estaba fajándose a su novia en la última fila del cine.Pedro was feeling his girlfriend up in the back row of the movie theater.
Copyright © Curiosity Media Inc.
fajar
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1. (periódico)
a. to put a wrapper on
2. (libro)
a. to put a band on
3. (colloquial)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
a. to attack, to assault
4. (colloquial) (River Plate)
a. to rip off
A pronominal verb always uses a reflexive pronoun. (e.g. Te ves cansado.).
5. (colloquial)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
a.
se fajaronthey had a scrap
Copyright © 2006 Harrap Publishers Limited
fajar
transitive verb
1 (envolver) to wrap
¡que lo fajen! (S. Cone) (México) tell him to wrap up! (familiar)
2 (vendar) to bandage
3 (Latinoamérica) (atacar) to attack; go for (familiar); (golpear) to beat up
4 (Cuba) (seducir) [+mujer] to try to seduce
intransitive verb
(Latinoamérica)
fajar con algn to go for sb; lay into sb (familiar)
pronominal verb
fajarse
1 (ponerse una faja) to put on one's belt
2 (Latinoamérica) (pelearse) to come to blows; fight
los boxeadores se fajaron duro the boxers really went for o laid into each other (familiar)
3
fajarse a algn to feel sb up (muy_familiar)
Collins Complete Spanish Electronic Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
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