Quick answer
"Fuck me" is an interjection which is often translated as "no me jodas", and "baby" is a noun which is often translated as "el/la bebé". Learn more about the difference between "fuck me" and "baby" below.
fuck me
An interjection is a short utterance that expresses emotion, hesitation, or protest (e.g. Wow!).
1.
A word or phrase that is crude, indecent, and generally rejected by society (e.g. fuck).
(vulgar)
(expressing astonishment)
a. no me jodas
A word or phrase that is crude, indecent, and generally rejected by society (e.g. fuck).
(vulgar)
Did you see that politician threaten to hit the reporter on camera? - Fuck me! That's crazy!¿Viste a ese político amenazar con golpearle al reportero en la cámara? - ¡No me jodas! ¡Qué loco!
b. no chingues
A word or phrase that is crude, indecent, and generally rejected by society (e.g. fuck).
(vulgar)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
Fuck me! I can't believe he actually paid you for that piece of shit.¡No chingues! No puedo creer que te haya pagado por esa mierda.
c. hostia
A word or phrase that is crude, indecent, and generally rejected by society (e.g. fuck).
(vulgar)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
I'm going to buy a Rolls Royce. - ¡Fuck me! Where did you get that kind of money?Me voy a comprar un Rolls Royce. - ¡Hostia! ¿De dónde sacaste tanto dinero?
d. mierda
A word or phrase that is crude, indecent, and generally rejected by society (e.g. fuck).
(vulgar)
Fuck me! All this exercise is going to kill me.¡Mierda! Tanto ejercicio va a acabar conmigo.
e. carajo
A word or phrase that is crude, indecent, and generally rejected by society (e.g. fuck).
(vulgar)
Fuck me! I can't believe she would do that to her friends.¡Carajo! No puedo creer que tratara a sus amigos así.
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
2. (to have sexual intercourse)
a. cogerme
A word or phrase that is crude, indecent, and generally rejected by society (e.g. fuck).
(vulgar)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Don't say you want to fuck me, you creep.No digas que quieres cogerme, asqueroso.
b. follarme
A word or phrase that is crude, indecent, and generally rejected by society (e.g. fuck).
(vulgar)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
That weirdo just said he wants to fuck me.Ese loco me dijo que quería follarme.
A phrase is a group of words commonly used together (e.g once upon a time).
phrase
3.
A word or phrase that is crude, indecent, and generally rejected by society (e.g. fuck).
(vulgar)
(imperative)
a. cógeme
A word or phrase that is crude, indecent, and generally rejected by society (e.g. fuck).
(vulgar)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
"I need you. Fuck me." - Ugh, what kind of movie are you watching?"Te necesito. Cógeme." - Guácala, ¿qué tipo de película estás viendo?
b. fóllame
A word or phrase that is crude, indecent, and generally rejected by society (e.g. fuck).
(vulgar)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Then the man said, "Fuck me." - Wow, what a crazy story.Luego el hombre dijo, "Fóllame." - Vaya, qué historia más loca.
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baby(
bey
-
bi
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (infant)
a. el bebé
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la bebé
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
The baby slept soundly through the night.El bebé durmió profundamente toda la noche.
b. el bebe
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la beba
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Honduras
(Honduras)
Regionalism used in Peru
(Peru)
(River Plate)
The babies happily listened to the lullaby.Los bebes escucharon felizmente la canción de cuna.
c. el nene
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la nena
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in the Caribbean: Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico
(Caribbean)
Regionalism used in South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela
(South America)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
How's your baby? Is she walking yet?¿Cómo está tu nena? ¿Ya camina?
d. el guagua
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la guagua
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(Andes)
We saw a ton of babies at the park.Vimos un montón de guaguas en el parque.
2. (animal)
a. la cría
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Rabbits can have babies every 30 days.Los conejos pueden tener crías cada 30 días.
3.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(term of endearment)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. amor
I love you so much, baby.Te quiero tanto, amor.
b. cariño
Baby, can you bring me some coffee?Cariño, ¿me puedes traer café?
c. nene
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(masculine)
Regionalism used in the Caribbean: Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico
(Caribbean)
Regionalism used in South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela
(South America)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Baby, you look so handsome in that suit.Nene, te ves guapísimo en ese traje.
d. nena
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(feminine)
Regionalism used in the Caribbean: Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico
(Caribbean)
Regionalism used in South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela
(South America)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Are you okay, baby? You look sad.¿Nena, estás bien? Te ves triste.
e. bebe
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Don't get mad, baby. You asked for my opinion, and I gave it to you.No te enfades, bebe. Me pediste mi opinión, y yo te la di.
4. (significant other)
a. el chico
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la chica
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Here comes my baby.Aquí viene mi chico.
5. (childish person)
a. el niño
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la niña
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Don't be such a baby! It doesn't hurt that much.¡No seas niño! No duele tanto.
An adjective is a word that describes a noun (e.g. the big dog).
6. (small)
a. pequeño
I had some baby carrots as a snack.Comí zanahorias pequeñas como merienda.
7. (for a baby)
a. de bebé
I gave her a baby blanket.Le regalé una cobija de bebé.
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
8. (to pamper)
a. mimar
I love to baby my cat.Me encanta mimar a mi gato.
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