Quick answer
"Chomp" is an intransitive verb which is often translated as "mascar", and "bounce" is an intransitive verb which is often translated as "rebotar". Learn more about the difference between "chomp" and "bounce" below.
chomp
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
1. (to chew; used with "on")
a. mascar
Vince is chomping on a carrot.Vince está mascando una zanahoria.
b. masticar
The kids like to chomp on jicama with chili, lime, and salt.A los chicos les gusta masticar jícama con chile, limón y sal.
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
2. (to chew)
a. masticar
My brother was chomping an apple while he studied.Mi hermano masticaba una manzana mientras estudiaba.
b. mascar
The cows are in the field chomping grass.Las vacas están en el campo mascando hierba.
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bounce(
bauns
)
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
1. (to move up after hitting a surface)
a. rebotar
The ball bounced once and then I caught it.La pelota rebotó una vez y luego la atrapé.
The bee bounced off the door and kept flying.La abeja rebotó contra la puerta y siguió volando.
b. picar
Regionalism used in South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela
(South America)
The ball bounced in the area.La pelota picó en el área.
c. botar
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
The rock bounced off his helmet.La piedra botó contra su casco.
2. (to move energetically)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
"I'll do it," he said, and bounced off."Yo lo haré", dijo y salió con paso elástico.
She came bouncing into the kitchen with a smile on her face.Entró a la cocina dando brincos con una sonrisa en la cara.
3.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to be rejected)
a. ser rechazado
You know that check you gave me? It bounced.¿Te acuerdas del cheque que me diste? Fue rechazado.
b. ser devuelto
I sent you an email, but it bounced. I might have got the address wrong.Te mandé un correo electrónico, pero fue devuelto. Tal vez me equivoqué con la dirección.
c. rebotar
An e-mail may bounce if there is a problem with the serverUn correo electrónico puede rebotar si hay problemas con el servidor.
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
4. (to cause to rebound)
a. hacer rebotar
The impact bounced us to the back of the truck.El impacto nos hizo rebotar hacia la parte trasera de la camioneta.
b. picar
Regionalism used in South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela
(South America)
The player bounced the ball three times before serving.El jugador picó la pelota tres veces antes de sacar.
c. hacer botar
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
She bounced the ball repeatedly trying to regain her composure.Hizo botar el balón una y otra vez, procurando recuperar la compostura.
d. botar
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
He was bouncing a tennis ball against the wall.Botaba una pelota de tenis contra la pared.
5. (to reject)
a. rechazar
The bank bounced his check because he had incurred an unauthorized overdraft.El banco rechazó su cheque porque se había sobregirado sin autorización.
b. devolver
The receiving mail system bounced your email because of the attachment.El sistema de correo receptor devolvió tu mensaje de correo electrónico a causa del adjunto.
6.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to force to leave)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. echar
Sheena was bounced from her previous school.A Sheena la echaron de su colegio anterior.
b. botar
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
He was getting bounced from one job after another.Lo botaban de un trabajo tras otro.
c. poner de patitas en la calle
They'll bounce him if his performance doesn't improve.Lo van a poner de patitas en la calle si su rendimiento no mejora.
d. plantar en la calle
I was afraid they'd bounce me, so I decided to toe the line.Tenía miedo de que me plantaran en la calle, así que decidí portarme como es debido.
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
7. (springing movement)
a. el rebote
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
You hit the ball on the second bounce, so it doesn't count.Golpeaste la pelota en el segundo rebote, así que no cuenta.
b. el bote
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Let's skim stones. How many bounces do think this stone will make?Hagamos patitos. ¿Cuántos botes crees que va a dar esta piedra?
8. (vitality)
a. la energía
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
My granfather has lost the bounce of his youth.Mi abuelo ha perdido la energía que tenía de joven.
9. (springiness)
a. la elasticidad
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
You can feel the bounce in the floor as you walk on it.Se siente la elasticidad del suelo cuando lo pisas.
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