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Quick answer
"Onto" is a preposition which is often translated as "a", and "get on" is a transitive verb phrase which is often translated as "subirse". Learn more about the difference between "onto" and "get on" below.
onto(
an
-
tu
)
A preposition is a word that indicates the relationship between a noun and another word (e.g. He ran through the door.).
1. (on top of)
a. a
The child climbed onto bed and sat next to his mother.El niño trepó a la cama y se sentó junto a su madre.
b. en
One of the engines stopped working, and the pilot had to land onto a golf course.Una de las turbinas falló y el piloto tuvo que aterrizar en un campo de golf.
c. sobre
I knocked over a glass, and wine spilled onto the table.Volqué un vaso y el vino se derramó sobre la mesa
2.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(aware of)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
I knew you were onto something, but I never imagined it was a surprise party for me.Sabía que estabas tramando algo, pero nunca me imaginé que sería una fiesta sorpresa para mí.
The mental-health patient claims that spies and aliens are onto him.El paciente de salud mental dice que hay espías y extraterrestres que andan tras él.
3. (in contact with)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
My boss has been onto me all month to have the project finished.Mi jefe estuvo encima de mí todo el mes para que terminara el proyecto.
Our son arrived safe and sound. I've just been onto him on the phone.Nuestro hijo llegó sano y salvo. Acabo de comunicarme con él por teléfono.
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get on(
giht
 
an
)
A transitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and requires a direct object (e.g. Take out the trash.).
transitive verb phrase
1. (to board)
a. subirse (often used with "en" or "a")
Hurry, let's get on the ship before it sails!¡Rápido, subámonos al barco antes de que zarpe!
b. montarse (often used with "en" or "a")
Sometimes I feel like getting on my bike and riding as far as I can until I run out of gas.A veces me dan ganas de montarme en mi moto y viajar hasta donde me alcance el combustible.
2. (to put on)
a. ponerse
Wake up and get your clothes on, soldier. We are under attack!Soldado, despiértate y ponte la ropa. ¡Nos están atacando!
3. (to place on)
a. poner en
Get the boxes on the shelves, please.Pongan las cajas en los estantes, por favor.
b. subir
We'll need a crane to get the beams on to the roof.Necesitaremos una grúa para subir las vigas al tejado.
4. (to spill on)
a. verter en
You klutz, you got wine on my white shirt.Eres un torpe, me vertiste vino en la camisa blanca.
5. (to call)
a. llamar por teléfono
As soon as she arrived home, she got on the phone to her parents so they wouldn't worry.En cuanto llegó a casa, llamó por teléfono a sus padres para que no se preocuparan.
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
6. (to get along well)
a. llevarse bien
My girlfriend hates that I don't get on with her parents.Mi novia odia que no me lleve bien con sus padres.
7. (to get along)
a. llevarse
How do you get on with your brother-in-law?¿Cómo te llevas con tu cuñado?
8. (to progress)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
Our party believes that financial aid is key to help the poor get on.Nuestro partido cree que la ayuda económica es fundamental para que los pobres puedan avanzar.
We can go home when we finish mopping the floor. Let's get on!Podremos irnos a casa cuando terminemos de trapear el piso. ¡Manos a la obra!
9. (to succeed)
a. tener éxito
You will often have to do things you hate to get on in the world.Para tener éxito en la vida, muchas veces tendrás que hacer cosas que odias.
10. (to manage)
a. arreglárselas
How's your son getting on alone in the city?¿Cómo se las arregla vuestro hijo solo en la ciudad?
b. ir a
I wonder how Stephen is getting on at his new school.Me pregunto cómo le va a Stephen en su nueva escuela.
11. (to do well) (United Kingdom)
a. ir bien a
I will go on vacation only if I get on in my final exams.Me iré de vacaciones solamente si me va bien en los exámenes finales.
12. (to get late)
a. ser casi
It's getting on to midnight. Bring the champagne and light the fireworks.Ya casi son las doce. Trae el champán y enciende los fuegos artificiales.
b. hacerse tarde
Shall we leave? It's getting on, and I don't like to drive at night.¿Nos vamos? Se está haciendo tarde y no me gusta manejar de noche.
c. atardecer
The kids haven't come home from school yet and it's getting on.Los niños todavía no han vuelto de la escuela y está atardeciendo.
13.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to get older)
a. ser mayor
Although she's getting on, she still looks like a young woman.Aunque es mayor, todavía parece una mujer joven.
b. hacerse mayor
My father is getting on. He walks more and more slowly.Mi padre se está haciendo mayor. Cada vez camina más despacio.
14. (to leave)
a. irse
We must get on. Our train is leaving in twenty minutes.Tenemos que irnos. Nuestro tren sale dentro de veinte minutos.
15. (to continue)
a. seguir
It's hardly raining. I think we can get on with the game.Apenas llueve. Yo creo que podemos seguir con el partido.
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