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Quick answer
"Go away" is an intransitive verb phrase which is often translated as "irse", and "shove" is a noun which is often translated as "el empujón". Learn more about the difference between "go away" and "shove" below.
go away(
go
 
uh
-
wey
)
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (to leave)
a. irse
Why won't those kids go away?¿Por qué no se van esos chicos?
b. marcharse
When did they go away?¿Cuándo se marcharon?
2. (to dissipate)
a. desaparecer
The bad odor will go away in a few minutes.El mal olor desaparecerá en unos minutos.
3. (to take a vacation)
a. irse de vacaciones
We're going away this weekend.Este fin de semana nos vamos de vacaciones.
A phrase is a group of words commonly used together (e.g once upon a time).
phrase
4. (imperative; used to address one person)
a. vete
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Go away, kid!¡Vete, niño!
b. lárgate
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Just go away! I don't want to talk to you anymore.¡Lárgate ya! No quiero hablar más contigo.
c. váyase
A word or phrase used to refer to the second person formal “usted” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. usted).
(formal)
(singular)
Go away before the boss comes back. If he sees you here, he'll fire you.Váyase antes de que vuelva el jefe. Si lo ve aquí, lo despide.
d. lárguese
A word or phrase used to refer to the second person formal “usted” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. usted).
(formal)
(singular)
Go away. You have no business here.Lárguese. Aquí no pinta nada.
5. (imperative; used to address multiple people)
a. váyanse (plural)
Please go away! You're all making too much noise.¡Váyanse, por favor! Están haciendo mucho ruido.
b. lárguense (plural)
Go away or I'll call the police!¡Lárguense o llamo a la policía!
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shove
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (push)
a. el empujón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
The guard gave the messenger a shove, knocking him off the drawbridge into the moat.El guardia le dio un empujón al mensajero, tirándolo del puente levadizo al foso.
b. el empellón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
I felt a shove from behind, and the next thing I knew, I was rolling down the hill.Sentí un empellón por detrás, y antes de darme cuenta, iba rodando cuesta abajo.
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
2. (to push)
a. empujar
Juan, don't shove your brother!Juan, ¡no empujes a tu hermano!
3. (to put)
a. poner
Victor shoved another log into the furnace.Victor puso otro leño en la caldera.
b. meter
The students began shoving their books into their bags as soon as the bell rang.Los alumnos comenzaron a meter sus libros en sus mochilas en cuanto sonó el timbre.
c. empujar
Tere told his son to clean up his room, and he shoved all the mess under the bed.Tere le dijo a su hijo que ordenara el cuarto, y el empujó todo el desorden debajo de la cama.
4.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to go to hell with; used with "with")
a. irse al demonio con
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Those politicians can shove their hollow promises.Esos políticos pueden irse al diablo con sus promesas falsas.
b. irse al carajo con
A word or phrase that is crude, indecent, and generally rejected by society (e.g. fuck).
(vulgar)
You can shove your apology. I never want to see you again.Puedes irte al carajo con tu disculpa. Nunca quiero volverte a ver.
c. irse a la chingada con
A word or phrase that is crude, indecent, and generally rejected by society (e.g. fuck).
(vulgar)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
The student told the teacher to shove his advice.El estudiante le dijo al maestro que se fuera a la chingada con sus consejos.
5. (to bully; used with "around")
a. mandonear
Juanito, stop shoving the other kids around or I'll have to call your parents.Juanito, deja de mandonear a los otros niños o tendré que llamar a tus papás.
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
6. (to push)
a. empujar
Everyone stop shoving! If you wait patiently, everyone will get into the auditorium.¡Dejen de empujar! Si esperan con paciencia, todos podrán entrar al auditorio.
7. (to leave; used with "off")
a. largarse
I didn't feel welcome, so I shoved off.No me senti bienvenido y me largué de ahí.
An interjection is a short utterance that expresses emotion, hesitation, or protest (e.g. Wow!).
8. (used to ask someone to leave; used with "off")
a. lárgate
What are you doing here? Shove off! I don't want to see you!!¿Qué haces aquí? ¡Lárgate! ¡No quiero verte!
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