Quick answer
"Check it out" is an interjection which is often translated as "echa un vistazo", and "check out" is a transitive verb phrase which is often translated as "mirar". Learn more about the difference between "check it out" and "check out" below.
check it out(
chehk
 
iht
 
aut
)
An interjection is a short utterance that expresses emotion, hesitation, or protest (e.g. Wow!).
1.
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
(look)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. echa un vistazo
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
The new website is live. Check it out!El sitio web está en directo. ¡Echa un vistazo!
b. cacha
Regionalism used in Chile
(Chile)
Check it out! Benjamin has a new car!¡Cacha! ¡Benjamín tiene un coche nuevo!
c. mirá
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Argentina
(Argentina)
Check it out! I learned to juggle.¡Mirá! Aprendí a hacer malabarismos.
d. juná
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(Southern Cone)
Dad's in the newspaper! Check it out!¡Juná! Papá está aquí, en el diario.
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check out(
chehk
 
aut
)
A transitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and requires a direct object (e.g. Take out the trash.).
transitive verb phrase
1. (to look at)
a. mirar
Check out that small dog chasing a cat!¡Mira a ese perrito persiguiendo un gato!
2. (to check)
a. verificar
Did you check out the hotel's website for reservations?¿Verificaste el sitio web del hotel para hacer una reserva?
b. comprobar
My phone died before I could check out the address.Mi teléfono se quedó sin batería antes de que pudiera comprobar la dirección.
c. investigar
The police checked out the bomb threat and it turned out to be a prank.La policía investigó la llamada de amenaza de bomba y resultó ser una broma.
d. chequear
The remote control is not working. - Did you check out the batteries?El control remoto no funciona. - ¿Chequeaste las pilas?
e. checar
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
Check out this video of two dogs dancing!¡Checa este video de dos perros bailando!
3. (to borrow)
a. sacar
I'd like to check out these three books, please.¿Puedo sacar estos tres libros, por favor?
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
4. (to become verified)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. cuadrar
The statements of the witnesses don't check out. One of them is lying.Las declaraciones de los testigos no cuadran. Uno de ellos miente.
5. (to pay)
a. pagar
I realized that I had a coupon only after I checked out and left the grocery store.Me di cuenta de que tenía un cupón justo después de pagar y salir del supermercado.
6. (to leave a lodging)
a. dejar
We checked out of the hotel and took a bus to the city center.Dejamos el hotel y tomamos un autobús para el centro.
b. hacer el check out
We have to check out by 9 am and be at the airport at 11 am.Tenemos que hacer el check out a las 9 am y estar en el aeropuerto a las 11 am.
7.
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
(to die)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. estirar la pata (colloquial)
Did you hear what happened to old man Charles? Dude checked out.Oíste lo que le pasó a ese viejito Charles? El tipo estiró la pata.
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