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A story that I am writing features a native of Madrid, and a woman from London. I want to keep their relationship a little murky, so I need a term of endearment that could apply to a very good female friend, as well as to a lover.

  • Posted Dec 1, 2008
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11 Answers

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ray said:

Carina/carino. To have an affection for. Sorry I have not put the accent above the letter n. Suete Robert. Ray.

It is not an accent, but a tilde, and it is not the letter N with a line on top, but a letter on its own, with a different sound, and used for different words. If you wrote "I vant" instead of "I want", would you say that you forgot to write the second V in W? Would you say that an R is a P with an extra leg?

Pena is sorrow; peña is a crag. It is not just a slight change in the sound, but a different word written with a different letter.

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" a native of Madrid," Is the "a native of Madrid" male or female? That alters the context querida/o grin

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Cariño is both masculine and femenine

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Why is the person from Madrid described as a native, but the woman from London is not described as a native of London? For a writer your simple sentence raises a lot of questions. I don't think that you will have any problems keeping their relationship "a little murky".
Some more context would help. What English term would you use and perhaps a Spanish equivalent could be provided. Other than that we're just guessing . Pet names between old friends and lovers usually carry a significance only shared by them. Almost any term can be used endearingly. An elderly woman lovingly refering to her husband as "the old fool" can be a term of endearment.

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"Cariño is both masculine and femenine"

How remarkably true grin

However, the question remains, viz, is the "native of madrid" male or female?

entiendes'

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Quentin said:

Why is the person from Madrid described as a native, but the woman from London is not described as a native of London?

Good call!

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Quentin said:

An elderly woman lovingly refering to her husband as "the old fool" can be a term of endearment.

I am going to call Eddy's attention to this, he might have something to say. lol

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Birdland said:

"Cariño is both masculine and femenine"

How remarkably true grin

However, the question remains, viz, is the "native of madrid" male or female?

entiendes?

Y la mujer de londres, ¿nació una mujer'

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Quentin said:

Why is the person from Madrid described as a native, but the woman from London is not described as a native of London? For a writer your simple sentence raises a lot of questions. I don't think that you will have any problems keeping their relationship "a little murky". Some more context would help. What English term would you use and perhaps a Spanish equivalent could be provided. Other than that we're just guessing . Pet names between old friends and lovers usually carry a significance only shared by them. Almost any term can be used endearingly. An elderly woman lovingly refering to her husband as "the old fool" can be a term of endearment.

And I thought my wife was insulting me these last few years.

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Do you have a specific term of endearment in English that you would like to be translated over to Spanish? That might be a little bit easier to find the equivalent. I think that it is always best to not change the writing and descriptive style of an author.

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I guess the question wasn't that important, since Roberts appears to have left the building. Ah well...

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