list of "go" verbs? | SpanishDict Answers
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5 Vote

Can anyone tell where I can find the list of "go" verbs??? Thanx, chili

  • Posted Sep 2, 2011
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8 Answers

5 Vote

go verbs

The so-called G-verbs (sometimes "go-verbs" or "yo-go" verbs) add a medial -g- (-ig- when the root ends in a vowel) in the first person singular, present tense, as well as in all persons of the present subjunctive. Many of these verbs are also irregular in other ways. For example:

  • poner: yo pongo, tú pones...
  • tener: yo tengo, tú tienes...
  • caer: yo caigo, tú caes...
  • traer: yo traigo, tú traes...
  • oír: yo oigo, tú oyes...
  • venir: yo vengo , tú vienes...
  • hacer: yo hago, tú haces...
  • salir: yo salgo, tú sales...
  • valer: yo valgo, tú vales...

¡Bienvenido al foro!

Welcome to the forum!

3 Vote

I would have never guessed what a "go" verb" is. Who came up with this weird name?

These verbs fall into three categories:

  • hacer: this verb (and similar ones like rehacer) has its own irregularities.

  • asir, oír, poner, salir, tener, valer, venir: these verbs (and related ones) simply add a g, e.g. "poner -> pono -> pongo"

  • caer, traer: these verbs (and related ones) simply add ig: "caer -> cao -> caigo"

There are around 80 verbs like this in Spanish, but they are all derived from the ones listed above.

  • I'm sure she didn't originate it, but Paralee refers to the "go verbs" in the lessons. - Goyo Sep 2, 2011 flag
3 Vote

ok

link text

2 Vote

Quite a few grammar books refer to them as "go" verbs.

Even Michel Thomas calls them "go-go" verbs. LOL.

Interesting, but very inaccurate, especially because most of them do not add a g, but ig, and the "o" is part of the regular conjugation. Maybe "ignorant verbs" can be a better word, hehe.

It is also interesting that the best results I have ever seen when it comes to becoming fluent in Spanish (from 6 months to 1 year) do not use this "go" terminology.

  • What has created the best results that you have ever seen ? - Stig345 Sep 2, 2011 flag
2 Vote

It is also interesting that the best results I have ever seen when it comes to becoming fluent in Spanish (from 6 months to 1 year) do not use this "go" terminology.

Fluent in 6 months OTHER than living in a Spanish-speaking country?? That has to be completely out of the norm. Otherwise, I am drastically doing something wrong.

1 Vote

Who came up with this weird name?

Quite a few grammar books refer to them as "go" verbs.

Even Michel Thomas calls them "go-go" verbs. LOL.

  • ...and "ga-ga" verbs as well :) - patch Sep 2, 2011 flag
  • Michel Thomas came up with the term to help people remember the irregularity. His classes are actually great. I do agree ... this sound weird, but the "tags" do help you remember. - Marc-Sill Jun 5, 2013 flag
0 Vote

I think they call them go verbs becuase they are common verbs. You go to them often, as in you are going to use them often when speaking. I think that's what go-verbs mean. That's what I was looking for when I typed go verbs. I guess I could have also googled common verbs or something.

0 Vote

I really like calling them yogo verbs that way you remember that there is a special "go" change in the yo form of the verb. I would also add digo (from decir) to this list even though it has an unusual stem change along with the yogo change. Maybe this is because it is an -ir stem changing verbs which are unique in many ways, especially in the preterite forms and the gerund forms (yuck!).

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