bustle
Listen to an audio pronunciation
Listen to an audio pronunciation
Listen to an audio pronunciation
bustle(
buh
-
suhl
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (activity)
a. el bullicio
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
We spent a weekend in the countryside to escape the bustle of the city.Pasamos un fin de semana en el campo para escaparnos del bullicio de la ciudad.
b. el ajetreo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
I can see the bustle of New York traffic from my hotel window.Puedo ver el ajetreo del tráfico neoyorquino desde la ventana del hotel.
c. el trajín
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
I woke up early to enjoy a leisurely breakfast before the bustle of the day set in.Me desperté temprano para disfrutar de un desayuno relajado antes de comenzar el trajín del día.
2.
A word or phrase that is no longer used in contemporary language and is recognized as being from another era (e.g. thou).
(archaic)
(frame under dress)
a. el polisón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
All of the ladies wore bustles under their dresses.Todas las damas llevaban polisones bajo los vestidos.
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
3. (to move busily)
a. trajinar
Daniel bustles all day and barely earns enough money to feed his family.Daniel trajina todo el día y apenas gana lo suficiente para dar de comer a su familia.
b. ir y venir
Susie had been bustling all day from conference room to conference room.Susie se la había pasado yendo y viniendo de sala de conferencia a sala de conferencia.
c.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
People bustle around from sunup to sundown in the city center.La gente anda de aquí para allá de sol a sol en el centro de la ciudad.
Students are bustling in and out of the dorms as they move in.Los estudiantes entran y salen afanosamente de los dormitorios mientras se instalan.
Copyright © Curiosity Media Inc.
bustle
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (activity)
a. el bullicio m, trajín
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
2. (general)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
to bustle (about)trajinar
Copyright © 2006 Harrap Publishers Limited
bustle [ˈbʌsl]
noun
(activity) ajetreo (m); bullicio (m); (haste) prisa (f);
intransitive verb
(also bustle about) ir y venir
to bustle in/out entrar/salir afanosamente
Bessie bustled in with two steaming mugs on a tray "I'll take care of that!" she snapped and bustled out of the kitchen
bustling with activity rebosante de actividad
...a thriving village bustling with activity The sidewalks are bustling with people
bustle [ˈbʌsl]
noun
(Hist) [of dress] polisón (m);
Collins Complete Spanish Electronic Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
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Phrases with "bustle"
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hustle and bustle
el ajetreo
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