bro
Listen to an audio pronunciation
Listen to an audio pronunciation
Listen to an audio pronunciation
bro(
bro
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(relative)
a. el hermano
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
My bro and I have been sharing a room since he was born.Mi hermano y yo hemos estado compartiendo una recámara desde que nació.
2.
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
(male friend)
a. el amigo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
My bro is coming over after school to play video games with me.Mi amigo viene después de clases para jugar videojuegos conmigo.
b. el cuate
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Central America: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama
(Central America)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
I'm going to put together a band with some of my bros.Voy a formar una banda con unos cuates.
c. el colega
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
My bro and I went for breakfast burritos before school.Mi colega y yo fuimos por unos burritos de desayuno antes de clases.
3.
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
(form of address)
a. el amigo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Bro, can you give me a hand with this?Amigo, ¿me ayudas con esto?
b. el hermano
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Bro, are you alright?Hermano, ¿estás bien?
c. el compadre
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
I'll take a hot dog with everything, bro.Quiero un hot dog con todo, compadre.
d. el mano
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Bro, that's too expensive! Give me a break.Mano, ¡eso es demasiado caro! Rebájale.
e. el mae
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Lend me five dollars, bro.Préstame cinco dólares, mae.
f. el macho
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
That's a nice car you're driving, bro.Eso es un lindo coche que conduces, macho.
g. el tío
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Hey, bro! What time is it?¡Oye, tío! ¿Qué hora tienes?
h. el colega
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Slow down, bro! You're talking too fast.¡Habla más lento, colega! Estás hablando demasiado rápido.
i. el güey
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
Pass me the salt, bro.Pásame la sal, güey.
j. el huevón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Chile
(Chile)
Let's go to the beach, bro.Vamos a la playa, huevón.
k. el boludo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
(River Plate)
Hey, bro! What's up?¡Che, boludo! ¿Qué onda?
4.
An offensive word or phrase used to degrade a person or group of people based on race, gender, sexual preference, etc. (e.g. ghetto).
(pejorative)
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
(unrefined young man)
a. el chusma
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
An offensive word or phrase used to degrade a person or group of people based on race, gender, sexual preference, etc. (e.g. ghetto).
(pejorative)
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
The pool hall has been overrun by bros. It's not a good place to take a date anymore.La sala de billar ha sido dominada por chusmas. Ya no sirve para llevar a alguien en una cita.
b. el fresón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
An offensive word or phrase used to degrade a person or group of people based on race, gender, sexual preference, etc. (e.g. ghetto).
(pejorative)
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in El Salvador
(El Salvador)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
All those bros ever talk about is their cars.Lo único que platican esos fresones es sus carros.
c. el naco
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
An offensive word or phrase used to degrade a person or group of people based on race, gender, sexual preference, etc. (e.g. ghetto).
(pejorative)
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
Look at that bro. He thinks he's still in high school.Mira a ese naco. Cree que sigue en la prepa.
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