I feel you, bro
Listen to an audio pronunciation
Listen to an audio pronunciation
I feel you, bro(
ay
 
fil
 
yu
 
bro
)
A phrase is a group of words commonly used together (e.g once upon a time).
phrase
1.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(general)
a. te entiendo, hermano
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
That test was hard. - I feel you, bro. I think I failed it.Ese examen fue difícil. - Te entiendo, hermano. Creo que lo reprobé.
b. te entiendo, huevón
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular) (Andes)
Regionalism used in Chile
(Chile)
Regionalism used in Colombia
(Colombia)
He is shameless! - I feel you, bro.¡Qué conchudo es esa pata! - Te entiendo, huevón.
c. te cacho, huevón
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular) (Andes)
Regionalism used in Chile
(Chile)
Regionalism used in Colombia
(Colombia)
Katie yelled at me today for no reason. - I feel you, bro. My girlfriend is driving me crazy too.Hoy Katie me gritó por ningún motivo. - Te cacho, huevón. Mi novia me está volviendo loco también.
d. te cacho, mano
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Regionalism used in the Caribbean: Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico
(Caribbean)
Regionalism used in Central America: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama
(Central America)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
My mom is driving me crazy. She wants to know where I am all the time. - I feel you, bro. My mom is the same way.Mi mamá me está volviendo loco. Quiere saber dónde estoy todo el tiempo. - Te cacho, mano. Mi mamá es igual.
e. sí, pe huevón
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Regionalism used in Peru
(Peru)
I don't want to work today. - I feel you, bro. Me either.No quiero chambear hoy - Sí, pe huevón. Yo tampoco.
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