boot
Listen to an audio pronunciation
Listen to an audio pronunciation
Listen to an audio pronunciation
Usage note
This word must be preceded by the definite article in the sense shown in 5).
boot(
but
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (footwear)
a. la bota
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
I'll need to buy a new pair of hiking boots before our vacation.Tendré que comprar unas nuevas botas de senderismo antes de nuestras vacaciones.
b. el botín
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(ankle boot)
Your feet must hurt in those high-heeled boots.Deben dolerte los pies con esos botines de tacón alto.
2. (transport) (United Kingdom)
a. el maletero
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
The suitcases won't fit in the boot.Las maletas no caben en el maletero.
b. el baúl
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Can you get the spare wheel out of the boot, please?¿Puedes sacar la rueda de repuesto del baúl, por favor?
c. la cajuela
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Bolivia
(Bolivia)
Regionalism used in Central America: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama
(Central America)
Regionalism used in the Dominican Republic
(Dominican Republic)
Regionalism used in Ecuador
(Ecuador)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
The boot of my car is always full of stuff.La cajuela de mi carro siempre está llena de cosas.
d. la maletera
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(Andes)
Regionalism used in Chile
(Chile)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
When the police opened the boot, they found several bags of money.Cuando los policías abrieron la maletera, encontraron varias bolsas de dinero.
e. la maleta
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Chile
(Chile)
Regionalism used in Uruguay
(Uruguay)
Regionalism used in Venezuela
(Venezuela)
Ana hid in the boot of a car in the hope of getting across the border.Ana se escondió en la maleta de un carro con la esperanza de cruzar la frontera.
3. (clamp)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. el cepo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
The police put a boot on my car because I was illegally parked.La policía puso un cepo en mi carro porque estaba estacionado ilegalmente.
4.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(kick)
a. la patada
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
I gave Paul a boot in the rear and he fell over.Le di a Paul una patada en el trasero y se cayó.
5.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(dismissal)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
Jimmy will get the boot if he doesn't work harder.A Jimmy le van a poner de patitas en la calle si no trabaja más.
Why were you given the boot?¿Por qué te despidieron?
6. (computing)
a. el arranque
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
What do I do to start the boot process?¿Qué hago para iniciar el proceso de arranque?
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
7. (to kick)
a. patear
Tim booted the ball into the air.Tim pateó el balón en el aire.
b. dar una patada a
Why did you boot your brother in the rear?¿Por qué le diste una patada en el trasero a tu hermano?
c. dar un puntapié a
David booted me in the stomach and ran off.David me dio un puntapié en el vientre y se fue corriendo.
d.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
Edward booted the door open.Edward abrió la puerta de un puntapié.
Mary booted the can into the ditch.Mary metió de una patada la lata en la cuneta.
8. (computing)
a. arrancar
You need to boot the computer to install the updates.Tienes que arrancar la computadora para instalar las actualizaciones.
b. inicializar
If this happens, you'll need to boot the system.Si esto ocurre, deberás inicializar el sistema.
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
9. (computing)
a. arrancar
I took my computer to the technician because it wouldn't boot.Llevé mi computadora al técnico porque no arrancaba.
Copyright © Curiosity Media Inc.
boot
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (footwear)
a. la bota
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
2. (ankle-length)
a. el botín
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
3. (military)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
boot campcampamento de reclutas
4. (of car) (United Kingdom)
a. el maletero
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
b. la cajuela
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
c. el baúl
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(Southern Cone)
5. (idioms)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
the boot is on the other footse ha dado la vuelta a la tortilla
6. (colloquial)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
to give somebody the bootponer a alguien de patitas en la calle
7. (colloquial)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
to get the bootser despedido(a)
8. (colloquial) (United Kingdom)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
to put or stick the boot into somebodydar una paliza a alguien
to bootademás, por añadidura
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
9. (colloquial)
a. dar una patada a (kick)
to boot somebody outponer a alguien en la calle
10. (computers)
a. arrancar
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
11. (computers)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
to boot (up)arrancar
Copyright © 2006 Harrap Publishers Limited
boot [buːt]
noun
1 bota (f); (ankle boot) borceguí (m)
he's getting too big for his boots
to die with one's boots on morir con las botas puestas
to fill one's boots Not everything in Japan looks bleak: having filled their boots with cheap capital in 1987-89, many companies remain liquid enough to do without bank loans
now the boot is on the other foot (Britain) ahora se ha dado vuelta a la tortilla
to give sb the boot despedir a algn; poner a algn en la calle (informal)
to get or be given the boot ser despedido
he was quaking or shaking or trembling in his boots le temblaban las piernas
If you stand up straight you'll give an impression of confidence even if you're quaking in your boots Someone had to tell the packed club that he wouldn't be appearing — you can imagine me shaking in my boots, but somehow I managed to survive
to lick sb's boots hacer la pelotilla a algn (informal)
to put the boot in (Britain) emplear la violencia; obrar decisivamente
2 (Britain) (Aut) maletero (m); baúl (m); (S. Cone) maletera (f); (And) (Chile) cajuela (f); (Méx)
3 (US) (Aut) (also Denver boot) cepo (m)
transitive verb
1 (kick) dar un puntapié a
to boot sb out poner a algn de patitas en la calle (informal)
2 (Comput) (also boot up) cebar; inicializar
intransitive verb
(Comput) (also boot up) cebar; inicializar
modifier
boot boy (n) (Britain) camorrista (m)
...a tough-looking boot boy, with a shaved head and numerous tattoos
boot camp (n) (in army) campamento (m) militar; (prison) prisión civil con régimen militar
boot polish (n) betún (m)
boot sale (n) (Britain)(also car boot sale) mercadillo (m) en el que se exponen las mercancías en el maletero del coche; (en el que se exponen las mercancías en el maletero del coche)
boot [buːt]
UNKNOWN
to boot además; por añadidura
Collins Complete Spanish Electronic Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
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