Quick answer
"Juice" is a noun which is often translated as "el jugo", and "Do you want water?" is a phrase which is often translated as "¿Quieres agua?". Learn more about the difference between "juice" and "Do you want water?" below.
juice(
jus
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (of fruit or vegetables)
a. el jugo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
I like to start my day with a glass of grapefruit juice.Me gusta comenzar el día con un vaso de jugo de toronja.
b. el zumo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
I make orange juice with oranges from my garden.Preparo zumo de naranja con naranjas de mi huerto.
2. (of meat)
a. el jugo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
If you overcook your meat, all the juices will dry up.Si se pasa demasiado la carne, todos los jugos se secan.
3. (anatomy)
a. el jugo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
The intestinal juice is secreted by the small intestine.El jugo intestinal es segregado por el intestino delgado.
4.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(gasoline)
a. la gasolina
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
The car ran out of juice after 300 miles.El auto se quedó sin gasolina después de 300 millas.
b. la nafta
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(River Plate)
There was no juice in the tank and no cash in our pockets.No nos quedaba nafta en el tanque ni plata en los bolsillos.
c. la bencina
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Chile
(Chile)
We need to put some juice in.Hay que echar bencina.
d. la gasofa
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Hell, we're running out of juice!¡Mierda, nos estamos quedando sin gasofa!
5.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(source of energy)
a. la luz
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(electricity)
There wasn't enough juice to run the generator.No había suficiente luz para hacer funcionar el generador.
b. la batería
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(battery)
My cell phone run out of juice at a critical moment.Mi celular se quedó sin batería en un momento crítico.
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
6. (to extract juice from)
a. exprimir
Can you help me juice these oranges?¿Me ayudas a exprimir estas naranjas?
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Do you want water?
A phrase is a group of words commonly used together (e.g once upon a time).
phrase
1. (used to address one person)
a. ¿Quieres agua?
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Do you want water? I also have lemonade or iced tea.¿Quieres agua? También tengo limonada o té helado.
b. ¿Quiere agua?
A word or phrase used to refer to the second person formal “usted” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. usted).
(formal)
(singular)
Sir, do you want water? - Yes, thank you.Señor, ¿quiere agua? - Sí, gracias.
2. (used to address multiple people)
a. ¿Quieren agua? (plural)
Thanks for cleaning out the garage, guys. Do you want water?Gracias por limpiar el garaje, chicos. ¿Quieren agua?
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