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Quick answer
"Enrollarse" is a pronominal verb which is often translated as "to become coiled up", and "ligar" is a transitive verb which is often translated as "to tie". Learn more about the difference between "enrollarse" and "ligar" below.
enrollarse(
ehn
-
roh
-
yahr
-
seh
)
A pronominal verb always uses a reflexive pronoun. (e.g. Te ves cansado.).
1. (to wrap up)
a. to become coiled up
Los cables de mis parlantes se enrollan si no los organizo bien.The cables from my speakers become coiled up if I don't organize them well.
b. to roll up
La cinta métrica me pegó la mano mientras se enrollaba.The tape measure slapped against my hand as it was rolling up.
2. (to be nice)
a. to be cool
El DJ se enrolló y nos puso la canción que pedimos.The DJ was cool and played the song we asked for.
b. to get on
Tu padre se enrolla muy bien con la gente joven.Your father gets on very well with young people.
3.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to go off on a tangent)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
a. to go on and on
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Mi madre se enrolla y acabo hablando horas con ella por teléfono.My mother goes on and on and I end up spending hours with her on the phone.
b. to get into
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Este profesor da buenas charlas, pero una vez que se enrolla en la química, no se lo puede callar.This professor gives great lectures, but once he gets into chemistry, you can't stop him.
c. to waffle
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Me he enrollado mucho y al final no le he dicho a Sam lo que le tenía que decir.I waffled too much and in the end I didn't tell Sam what I needed to tell her.
4. (to have intimate relations)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
a. to make out
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
Vi a Juan enrollándose con María en el bar, y luego los dos salieron juntos.I saw Juan making out with Maria at the bar, and later the two of them left together.
b. to get it on
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
Y después Miguel me acompañó hasta la habitación y nos enrollamos.And later Miguel followed me into the bedroom and we got it on.
c. to get off together
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(United Kingdom)
Jaime y Lucía empezaron a enrollarse en marzo, pero solo duró hasta mayo.Jaime and Lucia started to get off together in March, but it only lasted until May.
5.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to worry)
Regionalism used in Venezuela
(Venezuela)
a. to get worked up
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
No te enrolles porque no te haya contestado, seguro que está ocupado.Don't get worked up because he hasn't answered yet; I'm sure he's busy.
enrollar
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
6. (to wrap)
a. to roll up
En yoga siempre enrollamos las colchonetas después de la clase.In yoga we always roll up the mats after the class.
b. to coil up
Los bomberos enrollaron la manguera tras extinguir el fuego.The firefighters coiled up the hose after extinguishing the fire.
c. to wind up
El niño enrolló la cuerda alrededor del yoyó.The child wound up the string on the yo-yo.
7.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to implicate)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
a. to get involved
María siempre enrolla a Juan en sus problemas y al final sale él perdiendo.Maria always gets Juan involved in her problems and in the end he the one who loses out.
8. (to attract)
a. to be into
Me enrolla la idea de pasar las vacaciones contigo.I'm really into the idea of spending the holiday with you.
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ligar(
lee
-
gahr
)
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1. (to attach)
a. to tie
El hombre me ligó las manos a la silla con una cuerda de nailon.The man tied my hands to the chair with a nylon rope.
b. to tie up
El joven enmascarado ligó a Carmen con unas cuerdas que llevaba consigo.The youth in the mask tied Carmen up with some ropes that he had with him.
c. to bind
Les ligaron los pies con cinta para que no se escaparan.Their feet were bound with tape so that they couldn't run away.
2. (medicine)
a. to put a ligature on (an artery)
E! médico le ligó la arteria a la herida para detener la hemorragia.The doctor put a ligature on the injured woman's artery in order to stop the bleeding.
b. to tie (a tube)
Cuando nació mi hijo, me ligaron las trompas.When my son was born, I had my tubes tied.
c. to bind up (a foot, ankle or arm)
Le ligué a Ana el tobillo con un pañuelo.I bound Ana's ankle up with a scarf.
3. (to unite)
a. to bind
Este amor que me liga a él me está destrozando.This love which binds me to him is destroying me.
b. to bind together
Estaban divorciados, pero los ligaba el hijo que tenían en común.Although they were divorced, they were bound together by the son they had together.
c. to link
Las fotos publicadas parecen ligar al actor con el mundo de la droga.The published photos appear to link the actor to the world of drugs.
4. (culinary)
a. to bind
Hay que ligar la salsa con un trozo de manteca.You need to bind the sauce using a little lard.
b. to thicken
Esta harina es ideal para ligar salsas.This flour is perfect for thickening sauces.
5. (metallurgy)
a. to alloy
En este experimento vamos a ligar mercurio y plata.In this experiment we will alloy mercury with silver.
6.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(cards)
a. to get
Ligó tres fulls seguidos jugando al póker.He got three full houses playing poker.
7.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to obtain) (River Plate)
a. to get
No vale la pena comprar cereales de esta marca solo para ligar un juguete.It isn't worth buying this brand of cereal just to get a toy.
b. to get hold of
¿Dónde puedo ligar un vestido como el que llevas?Where can I get hold of a dress like the one you're wearing?
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
8.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to enjoy romantic success; often used with "con")
a. to make out
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
Era tan tímido que necesitaba beber para ligar.He was so shy that he needed to drink to make out.
b. to pull
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(United Kingdom)
Aquella noche salimos todas dispuestas a ligar.We all went out ready to pull that night.
c. to get off with
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(United Kingdom)
¿Has ligado con ese chico que te gusta?Did you get off with that boy you like?
d. to score
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Me dicen que ligaste anoche. ¿Quién era?I'm told you scored last night. Who was she?
9.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to be fortunate)
Regionalism used in Cuba
(Cuba)
(River Plate)
Regionalism used in Venezuela
(Venezuela)
a. to be lucky
Aunque no jugué bien, ligué y gané la partida.Even though I didn't play well, I was lucky and won the game.
b. to go well
Le ligó el asunto y consiguió el trabajo.Things went well for him and he got the job.
ligarse
A reflexive verb is a verb that indicates that the subject performs an action on itself (e.g. Miguel se lava.).
10. (to join; used with "a")
a. to commit oneself to
El jugador británico está a punto de ligarse al equipo español para las próximas cuatro temporadas.The British player is about to commit himself to the Spanish team for the next four seasons.
A pronominal verb always uses a reflexive pronoun. (e.g. Te ves cansado.).
11.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to hook up with)
a. to make out with
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
Se ligó a esa pelirroja de la clase.He made out with that redhead in the class.
b. to get off with
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(United Kingdom)
Al final, Lucy se ha ligado al capitán del equipo de fútbol.Lucy has finally got off with the captain of the football team.
c. to pick up
Daniel se ligó a una chica en un casino.Daniel picked up a girl at a casino.
12.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to receive punishment) (River Plate)
a. to get
Se ligó un mes de aislamiento.He got one month in solitary confinement.
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