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Quick answer
"Enrollarse" is a pronominal verb which is often translated as "to become coiled up", and "liarse" is a pronominal verb which is often translated as "to confuse". Learn more about the difference between "enrollarse" and "liarse" below.
enrollarse(
ehn
-
roh
-
yahr
-
seh
)
A pronominal verb always uses a reflexive pronoun. (e.g. Te ves cansado.).
1. (to wrap up)
a. to become coiled up
Los cables de mis parlantes se enrollan si no los organizo bien.The cables from my speakers become coiled up if I don't organize them well.
b. to roll up
La cinta métrica me pegó la mano mientras se enrollaba.The tape measure slapped against my hand as it was rolling up.
2. (to be nice)
a. to be cool
El DJ se enrolló y nos puso la canción que pedimos.The DJ was cool and played the song we asked for.
b. to get on
Tu padre se enrolla muy bien con la gente joven.Your father gets on very well with young people.
3.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to go off on a tangent)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
a. to go on and on
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Mi madre se enrolla y acabo hablando horas con ella por teléfono.My mother goes on and on and I end up spending hours with her on the phone.
b. to get into
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Este profesor da buenas charlas, pero una vez que se enrolla en la química, no se lo puede callar.This professor gives great lectures, but once he gets into chemistry, you can't stop him.
c. to waffle
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Me he enrollado mucho y al final no le he dicho a Sam lo que le tenía que decir.I waffled too much and in the end I didn't tell Sam what I needed to tell her.
4. (to have intimate relations)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
a. to make out
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
Vi a Juan enrollándose con María en el bar, y luego los dos salieron juntos.I saw Juan making out with Maria at the bar, and later the two of them left together.
b. to get it on
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
Y después Miguel me acompañó hasta la habitación y nos enrollamos.And later Miguel followed me into the bedroom and we got it on.
c. to get off together
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(United Kingdom)
Jaime y Lucía empezaron a enrollarse en marzo, pero solo duró hasta mayo.Jaime and Lucia started to get off together in March, but it only lasted until May.
5.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to worry)
Regionalism used in Venezuela
(Venezuela)
a. to get worked up
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
No te enrolles porque no te haya contestado, seguro que está ocupado.Don't get worked up because he hasn't answered yet; I'm sure he's busy.
enrollar
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
6. (to wrap)
a. to roll up
En yoga siempre enrollamos las colchonetas después de la clase.In yoga we always roll up the mats after the class.
b. to coil up
Los bomberos enrollaron la manguera tras extinguir el fuego.The firefighters coiled up the hose after extinguishing the fire.
c. to wind up
El niño enrolló la cuerda alrededor del yoyó.The child wound up the string on the yo-yo.
7.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to implicate)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
a. to get involved
María siempre enrolla a Juan en sus problemas y al final sale él perdiendo.Maria always gets Juan involved in her problems and in the end he the one who loses out.
8. (to attract)
a. to be into
Me enrolla la idea de pasar las vacaciones contigo.I'm really into the idea of spending the holiday with you.
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liarse
A pronominal verb always uses a reflexive pronoun. (e.g. Te ves cansado.).
1. (to get disconcerted)
a. to confuse
Dijiste que no me amabas y ahora dices que sí. ¡Me estás liando!You said you didn't love me and now you say you do. You're confusing me!
b. to get muddled up
Mi madre se lía con el celular porque no sabe usar el teclado táctil.My mother gets muddled up with her cell phone because she can't use the touch keyboard.
2. (to commence)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
a. to begin
Me lié a escribir postales sin darme cuenta de que no tenía sellos suficientes.I began to write postcards without realizing I did not have enough stamps.
b. to start
Desde que te liaste a leer libros en francés has aprendido mucho.Ever since you started reading books in French you have learned a lot.
3.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to get embroiled)
a. to get mixed up
Laura no se quiere liar en los problemas de la familia de su marido.Laura does not want to get mixed up with the problems of her husband's family.
b. to get involved
Si me lío en este asunto voy a salir perdiendo.If I get involved in this matter, I will end up losing.
4. (to have something)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
a. to have an affair
Sara y Mario se liaron en verano y ahora son novios.Sara and Mario had an affair in summer and now they are together.
liar
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
5. (to prepare)
a. to roll
Suelo fumar cigarros que lío yo mismo porque las cajetillas son más caras.I usually smoke cigarettes that I roll myself because the packs are more expensive.
6. (to bind)
a. to tie up
Asegúrate de liar bien el fardo antes de enviarlo.Make sure you tie up the bundle properly before sending it.
7. (to cover)
a. to wrap
Lié los vasos con un suéter para que no se rompieran durante la mudanza.I wrapped the glasses in a sweater so that they would not break during the move.
b. to wrap up
El asesino lió la manta al cadaver y luego lo tiró al mar.The killer wrapped the corpse up in a blanket and then threw it into the sea.
8. (to make difficult)
a. to complicate
Las mentiras de los acusados liaron la labor de búsqueda del desaparecido de la policía.The defendant's lies complicated the police's search effort for the missing person.
9. (to disconcert)
a. to confuse
Marta lió a Miguel con sus pistas y por eso él dijo la respuesta incorrecta.Marta confused Miguel with her hints and so he gave the wrong answer.
Copyright © Curiosity Media Inc.
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