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Quick answer
"Empollar" is a transitive verb which is often translated as "to brood", and "chapar" is a transitive verb which is often translated as "to plate". Learn more about the difference between "empollar" and "chapar" below.
empollar(
ehm
-
poh
-
yahr
)
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1. (to hatch)
a. to brood
El pato estaba en la sombra empollando sus huevos.The duck was in the shade brooding its eggs.
El águila macho está buscando comida mientras la hembra empolla los huevos.The male eagle is looking for food while the female is brooding the eggs.
b. to incubate
Una gallina empolla como 12 huevos a la vez.A hen incubates about 12 eggs at a time.
c. to sit on
El ave pasó 21 días empollando sus huevos.The bird spent 21 days sitting on its eggs.
2.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to study hard)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
a. to cram
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Julia pretendía empollar todo el libro la noche antes de la prueba.Julia intended to cram the whole book the night before the test.
b. to swot up
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(United Kingdom)
Empollé la guía de matemáticas una hora antes del examen.I swotted up the math guide an hour before the exam.
c. to swot up on
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(United Kingdom)
No puedo salir. Tengo que empollar el tema de historia.I can't go out. I need to swot up on the history lesson.
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
3. (to hatch)
a. to brood
¿Cuánto tiempo les lleva a estas aves empollar?How long does it take these birds to brood?
4.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to study hard)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
a. to cram
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Pasé toda la noche empollando para el examen y al final reprobé.I spent all night cramming for the exam and in the end I failed.
b. to swot
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(United Kingdom)
Felipe empolló toda la semana y sacó la mejor calificación.Felipe swotted the whole week and got the best grade.
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chapar(
chah
-
pahr
)
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1. (to coat)
a. to plate (with metal)
Ana se hizo chapar su anillo de plata con oro 18 kilates.Ana had her silver ring plated in 18 karat gold.
b. to veneer (with wood)
La mesa es de aglomerado, pero la chaparon con roble.This table is made of chipboard, but it was veneered with oak.
2.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to seal)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
a. to shut
Desde que chaparon mi restaurante favorito ya no sé dónde ir a comer.Since my favorite restaurant was shut I don't know where to go to have lunch.
b. to close
Tras la inspección sanitaria chaparon el antro.They closed the dive after the health inspection.
3.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to surprise)
Regionalism used in Argentina
(Argentina)
Regionalism used in Peru
(Peru)
Regionalism used in Uruguay
(Uruguay)
a. to catch
El profesor chapó al alumno copiando en el examen y lo desaprobó.The teacher caught the student cheating in the exam and failed him.
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
4.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to study)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
a. to cram
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Mi hijo lleva chapando todo el fin de semana para los finales.My son has been cramming the whole weekend for finals.
b. to swot
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Mis hijos están estudiando para los exámenes de ingreso.My kids are swotting for their entrance exams.
5.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to kiss and caress)
Regionalism used in Argentina
(Argentina)
Regionalism used in Bolivia
(Bolivia)
a. to make out
Juan y Malena se pasaron toda la película chapando.Juan and Malena spent the whole movie making out.
Copyright © Curiosity Media Inc.
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