Quick answer
"Desde" is a preposition which is often translated as "from", and "salir de" is a transitive verb phrase which is often translated as "to go out of". Learn more about the difference between "desde" and "salir de" below.
desde(
dehs
-
deh
)
A preposition is a word that indicates the relationship between a noun and another word (e.g. He ran through the door.).
1. (used to indicate origin)
a. from
Esa foto se tomó desde mi casa.That picture was taken from my house.
2. (used to indicate time)
a. since
No nos habíamos visto desde la última reunión de clase.We hadn't seen each other since the last class reunion.
b. from
Desde hoy en adelante ya no fumo.From now on I will no longer smoke.
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salir de(
sah
-
leer
 
deh
)
A transitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and requires a direct object (e.g. Take out the trash.).
transitive verb phrase
1. (to exit)
a. to go out of
Al salir de casa, noté el aire fresco de la mañana en mi rostro.As I went out of the house I felt the cool morning air on my face.
b. to leave
Varios senadores salieron de la cámara cuando Romero tomó la palabra.Several senators left the chamber when Romero took the floor.
c. to come out of
¡Policía! ¡Por favor, salgan del apartamento con las manos en alto!Police! Please come out of the apartment with your hands up!
d. to get out of
Esta agua ya no está caliente. Sal de la bañera, que te vas a enfriar.The water is not warm anymore. Get out of the bathtub or else you'll get cold.
2. (to depart from)
a. to leave
Saldremos de Edimburgo a las 9 pm hora local.We'll leave Edinburgh at 9 pm local time.
3. (to end the school or working day)
a. to finish
¿A qué hora salen de la escuela hoy? - A las cinco.What time will you finish school today? - At five o'clock.
4. (to originate in or from)
a. to come from
Obras maestras como "El rey Lear" solo pueden salir de la mente de un genio como Shakespeare.Such masterpieces as "King Lear" can only come from the mind of a genius like Shakespeare.
5. (to appear from behind or out of)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
En la primera secuencia vemos un camión saliendo de entre la niebla.In the first sequence we see a truck coming out of the fog.
La luna salió de detrás de las montañas.The moon came up from behind the mountains.
6. (to make it through)
a. to come through
Marta salió bien de la operación y ahora se está recuperando.Marta came through the operation okay, and now she's recovering.
b. to come out of
Sara intentó por todos los medios salir del tremendo lío en que se había metido.Sara tried by all possible means to come out of the terrible mess she'd gotten herself into.
c. to get out of
El mundo tardó décadas en salir de verdad de aquella larga crisis económica.It took the world decades to actually get out of the long economic crisis.
d. to overcome
Es muy duro salir de una depresión.It's very hard to overcome depression.
7. (computing)
a. to exit
Pulse aquí para salir del programa.Press here to exit the program.
8. (film, theater, television)
a. to play
El tío Paco salía de soldado ruso en 'Doctor Zhivago'.Uncle Paco played a Russian soldier in 'Doctor Zhivago'.
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