Quick answer
"Parad" is a form of "parar", a transitive verb which is often translated as "to stop". "De la mano" is a phrase which is often translated as "hand in hand". Learn more about the difference between "de la mano" and "parad" below.
de la mano
A phrase is a group of words commonly used together (e.g once upon a time).
phrase
1. (general)
a. hand in hand
Ana y Juan iban caminando de la mano.Ana and Juan were walking hand in hand.
b.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
Le estoy enseñando a mi beba a tenerme de la mano.I'm teaching my baby girl to hold my hand.
El hombre tomó a la anciana de la mano y la ayudó a cruzar la calle.The man took the old lady by her hand and helped her cross the street.
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parar(
pah
-
rahr
)
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1. (to halt)
a. to stop
¡Paren el tráfico! Alguien está tirado en la calle.Stop the traffic! Someone's lying in the road.
2. (to block)
a. to save
Fabianski paró el balón, evitando un gol de Muller.Fabianski saved the ball, blocking a goal by Muller.
b. to stop
El portero paró el tiro libre y ganó el partido.The goalkeeper stopped the free kick and won the game.
c. to intercept
García lanzó el balón y Hernández lo paró.García kicked the ball and Hernandez intercepted it.
3. (to avoid)
a. to block
Es tan importante parar como golpear.Blocking is as important as punching.
b. to ward off
El boxeador logró parar varios golpes, pero al final su contrincante lo tumbó.The boxer managed to ward off several blows, but in the end his opponent knocked him down.
c. to parry
Estamos aprendiendo a parar en las clases de esgrima.We're learning how to parry in our fencing classes.
4. (to erect)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
a. to stand up
Paren el muñeco en la mesa para terminar de arreglarle el traje.Stand the doll up on the table so I can finish fixing its outfit.
b. to raise
Paren el librero allí cerca de esa pared, por favor.Raise the bookshelf over there by that wall, please.
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
5. (to halt)
a. to stop
¿Sabe si el número 20 para aquí cerca?Do you know if the number 20 stops nearby?
6. (to cease)
a. to stop
¡Por favor para de cantar! ¿No ves que estoy estudiando?Please stop singing! Can't you see I'm studying?
7. (to reach a final goal or circumstance)
a. to end up
¿Adónde fuiste a parar la otra noche?Where did you end up the other night?
b. to happen
¿Dónde habrá ido a parar Sofía después de la graduación?I wonder what happened to Sofia after graduation?
c. to become
No sé a dónde va a parar con ese mal genio que tiene.I don’t know what’s going to become of her with that bad temper.
d. to get to
¿En dónde habrá parado el perro?Where can the dog have got to?
8. (to strike)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
a. to go on strike
El sindicato ha dicho que paren el martes.The union said to go on strike on Tuesday.
9. (to lodge)
a. to stay
La pareja dijo que planean parar en Madrid por tres noches.The couple said they plan to stay in Madrid for three nights.
10.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to spend time with; used with "con")
Regionalism used in South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela
(South America)
a. to hang out
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Miguel dijo que iba a parar con Ronaldo este viernes.Miguel said he was going to hang out with Ronaldo this Friday.
pararse
A reflexive verb is a verb that indicates that the subject performs an action on itself (e.g. Miguel se lava.).
11. (to halt)
a. to stop
Siempre se para a saludarnos cuando nos ve.She always stops to say hello when she sees us.
12. (to rise)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
a. to stand up
El público se paró cuando terminó el pianista.The audience stood up when the pianist finished.
b. to get up (from bed)
Regionalism used in Central America: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama
(Central America)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
Siempre se para tarde los fines de semana.He always gets up late on weekends.
A pronominal verb always uses a reflexive pronoun. (e.g. Te ves cansado.).
13. (to stick up)
a. to stand on end
Se te parará el pelo con esa película.That movie will make your hair stand on end.
14. (to quit working)
a. to stop
El carro se paró porque le falta aceite al motor.The car stopped because the engine needs oil.
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