Quick answer
"Cram" is a transitive verb which is often translated as "meter", and "stuff" is a noun which is often translated as "las cosas". Learn more about the difference between "cram" and "stuff" below.
cram(
krahm
)
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1. (to stuff)
a. meter
They took every joke that's ever been written and crammed them into that movie.Tomaron todas las bromas que jamás se han escrito y las meterieron en esa película.
b. embutir
I've crammed everything we need for the trip in the car.He embutido todo lo que necesitamos para el viaje en el auto.
c. llenar
We crammed our weekend full of fun outdoor activities.Llenamos por completo el fin de semana con actividades divertidas al aire libre.
d. apiñar
All my friends crammed themselves into the photo.Todos mis amigos se apiñaron para la foto.
2.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to study intensively)
a. empollar
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
I've crammed a semester's worth of material into my brain in preparation for my exam tomorrow.He empollado el material de todo un semestre para prepararme para el examen de mañana.
b. memorizar
The students crammed the periodic table in preparation for the chemistry exam.Los estudiantes memorizaron la tabla periódica como preparación para el examen de química.
c. prepararse intensivamente
She crammed all her notes the night before the exam.Se preparó intensivamente con todos sus apuntes la noche antes del examen.
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
3.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to study intensively)
a. empollar
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Sophie spent all night cramming.Sophie pasó la noche entera empollando.
b. tragar
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(River Plate)
Nathan didn't go out with his friends because he's cramming for his finals.Nathan no salió con sus amigos porque está tragando para sus examenes finales.
c. memorizar
Mack knew he didn't have enough time to cram, so he just said a prayer.Mack sabía que no tenía suficiente tiempo para memorizar todo, así que se limitó a decir una plegaria.
d. matarse a estudiar
Donna spent too much time going to parties this semester, and now she'll be cramming.Donna pasó demasiado tiempo yéndose de fiesta este semestre y ahora se matará a estudiar.
4. (to fit)
a. apiñarse
It was hot outside, and felt even hotter with all the people cramming together in the line.Hacía calor fuera y sintió aun más calor con todas las personas apiñándose en la línea.
b. meterse
The elevator was like a sardine can, but we crammed in the best we could so we wouldn't have to wait for the next one.El ascensor parecía una lata de sardinas, pero nos metimos como pudimos para no tener que esperar al siguiente.
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stuff(
stuhf
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(matters)
a. las cosas
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
I have so much stuff to do at work today.Tengo un montón de cosas que hacer hoy en el trabajo.
2.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(substance)
a. la cosa
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
What's that sticky stuff?¿Qué es esa cosa pegajosa?
b. las cosas
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Shall I put chocolate sprinkles on your ice cream? - No, thank you. I don't really like the stuff.¿Te pongo chispas de chocolate en el helado? - No, gracias, no me gustan mucho esas cosas.
c.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
Shall I get you some tomato ketchup? - No thanks. I never eat the stuff.¿Te traigo ketchup? - No, gracias, nunca tomo.
This stuff tastes horrible!¡Esto tiene un sabor horrible!
3.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(belongings)
a. las cosas
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Please don't touch my stuff without asking me first.Por favor no toques mis cosas sin pedirme primero.
b. los chismes
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
When she asked to borrow my stuff, I didn't mean she could sell it.Cuando me pidió que le dejara mis chismes, no le di permiso para que pudiera venderlos.
4.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(ideas)
a. el cuento
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
If you really believe that stuff then you are just too gullible.Si realmente te crees ese cuento, eres una persona muy ingenua.
5.
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
(drugs)
a. la mercancía
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Do you have some of that good stuff you sold me last week?¿Tienes de la mercancía buena que me vendiste la semana pasada?
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
6. (to fill)
a. rellenar
I stuffed the turkey with bread, onion, and some herbs.Rellené el pavo con pan, cebolla y algunas hierbas aromáticas.
b. tapar
You can stuff the holes in the wall with putty.Puedes tapar los agujeros de la pared con masilla.
c. disecar
The old lady who lives in my neighborhood stuffs all her dogs after they die.La viejita que vive en mi vecindario diseca todos sus perros después de morir.
7. (to put)
a. meter
Can you stuff the sleeping bag into that backpack?¿Puedes meter el saco de dormir dentro de esa mochila?
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