Quick answer
"Can" is an auxiliary verb which is often translated as "poder", and "you" is a pronoun which is often translated as "tú". Learn more about the difference between "can" and "you" below.
can(
kahn
)
An auxiliary verb, or helper verb, is a conjugated verb that comes before a main verb and determines the main verb's tense, mood, or aspect (e.g. I have gone.).
1. (used to indicate ability)
a. poder
I can run five miles in an hour.Puedo correr cinco millas en una hora.
b. saber
I can cook Italian food too.También sé cocinar comida italiana.
2. (used to ask permission)
a. poder
Can I go out with Jennifer on Friday night?¿Puedo salir con Jennifer el viernes por la noche?
3. (used to indicate possibility)
a. poder
If you like, you can have the salad with the dressing on the side.Si desea, puede pedir la ensalada con el aderezo al lado.
4. (with verbs of perception)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
I can't tell if it's going to rain or snow.No sé si va a llover o nevar.
I couldn't see because of the brightness of that light.No veía por culpa del resplandor de esa luz.
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
5. (container)
a. la lata
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
There are about 140 calories in one can of soda.Una lata de refresco tiene unas 140 calorías.
b. el bote
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Do you think one can of paint will be enough for the whole room?¿Crees que con un bote de pintura nos llega para toda la habitación?
6.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(toilet)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. el baño
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
I rushed to the can but it was occupied.Corrí al baño pero estaba ocupado.
7. (fuel container)
a. el bidón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Packing an empty gas can in your trunk is wise.Llevar un bidón de gasolina vacío en el maletero es inteligente.
8.
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
(prison)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. la chirona
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
They threw him in the can for armed robbery.Lo tiraron a la chirona por robo armado.
9.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(buttocks)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. el culo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Rob deserves a good kick in the can for that.Rob se merece una buena patada en el culo por eso.
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
10. (to preserve by sealing)
a. enlatar
She usually cans vegetables for the homeless every December.Suele enlatar verduras para la gente sin hogar cada diciembre.
11.
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
(to fire)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. poner de patitas en la calle
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
My boss canned me for reading comics at work.El jefe me puso de patitas en la calle por leer cómics en el trabajo.
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you(
yu
)
A pronoun is a word that stands in for a noun (e.g. she).
1. (subject; used to address one person)
a.
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
You are so tall, Sam.Tú eres bien alto, Sam.
b. usted
A word or phrase used to refer to the second person formal “usted” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. usted).
(formal)
(singular)
These pants will suit you, sir, because you are short.Estos pantalones le quedarán bien, señor, porque usted es bajo.
c. vos
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
You've been to New York, haven't you?Vos estuviste en Nueva York, ¿verdad?
2. (object; used to address one person)
a. te
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
I'll see you there.Te veré allí.
b. le
A word or phrase used to refer to the second person formal “usted” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. usted).
(formal)
(singular)
I'll tell you where to go.Le diré a dónde ir.
c. lo
A word or phrase used to refer to the second person formal “usted” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. usted).
(formal)
(masculine) (singular)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
I think I saw you in the park yesterday.Creo que lo vi en el parque ayer.
d. la (feminine)
A word or phrase used to refer to the second person formal “usted” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. usted).
(formal)
(singular)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
La llamé ayer.I called you yesterday.
e. ti
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular) (after a preposition)
I'll do it for you.Lo haré por ti.
f. usted
A word or phrase used to refer to the second person formal “usted” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. usted).
(formal)
(singular) (after a preposition)
Do you like to play basketball?¿A usted le gusta jugar al baloncesto?
3. (subject; used to address multiple people)
a. ustedes (plural)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
You two are funny.Ustedes dos son chistosos.
b. vosotros (masculine or mixed gender) (plural)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Are you hungry, guys?¿Vosotros tenéis hambre, chicos?
c. vosotras (feminine) (plural)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
You are all very beautiful.Vosotras sois todas muy hermosas.
4. (object; used to address multiple people)
a. les (plural)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
I am going to buy you lunch.Voy a comprarles el almuerzo.
b. os
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(plural)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
What do you think?¿Qué os parece?
c. les
A word or phrase used to refer to the second person formal “usted” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. usted).
(formal)
(plural)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
I'll let you know the meeting date by Friday.Les comunicaré la fecha de la reunión antes del viernes.
d. ustedes (plural) (after a preposition)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
I'm going with you.Voy con ustedes.
e. vosotros
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(plural) (after a preposition)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Where are the keys? - I gave them to you.Where are the keys? - I gave them to you.
f. vosotras
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(plural) (after a preposition)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Do you like wine?¿A vosotras os gusta el vino?
5. (impersonal)
a. se
You don't lie to your parents.No se miente a los padres.
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