suck up

suck up(
suhk
 
uhp
)
A transitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and requires a direct object (e.g. Take out the trash.).
transitive verb phrase
1. (to absorb)
a. aspirar
Don keeps this vacuum in the shop to suck up the sawdust.Don guarda esta aspiradora en el taller para aspirar el aserrín.
b. succionar
This duct sucks up any excess liquid inside the system.Este ducto succiona todo el exceso de líquido dentro del sistema.
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
2.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to brownnose; often used with "to")
a. lamer las botas
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
The intern is always sucking up to the editor of the magazine.El pasante siempre le está lamiéndole las botas al director de la revista.
b. lamer el culo
A word or phrase that is crude, indecent, and generally rejected by society (e.g. fuck).
(vulgar)
I'm not going to suck up to my boss just for a promotion.No voy a lamerle el culo a la jefa solo para que me dé un ascenso.
c. chupar las medias
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Central America: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama
(Central America)
Regionalism used in South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela
(South America)
The host of the show was sucking up to the actress the entire interview.El presentador del programa le chupó las medias a la actriz durante toda la entrevista.
d. hacer la barba
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
You're not going to get what you want by sucking up to me.No vas a conseguir lo que quieres haciéndome la barba.
e. hacer la pata
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Chile
(Chile)
His colleagues hate him because he's always sucking up to the boss.Sus colegas lo odian porque siempre está haciéndole la pata al jefe.
f. lambonear
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Colombia
(Colombia)
Regionalism used in Ecuador
(Ecuador)
Regionalism used in Panama
(Panama)
Sucking up to the manager won't get you anywhere in this company.Lambonear al gerente no te va a llevar a ningún lado en esta empresa.
g. jalar mecate
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Venezuela
(Venezuela)
Stop sucking up to the teacher and do your homework instead.Deja de jalarle mecate al maestro y mejor haz tus tareas.
h. lamer el ojo
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Puerto Rico
(Puerto Rico)
Sometimes, sucking up a little could be worth your while.A veces, te puede merecer la pena lamer el ojo un poquito.
i. hacer la pelota
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Quit sucking up to Mom; she already said no.Deja de hacerle la pelota a mamá; que ya te dijo que no.
suck-up
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
noun
3.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(general)
a. el lamebotas
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(M)
, la lamebotas
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(F)
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Here comes Milly with an apple for the teacher. What a suck-up.Ya llegó Milly con una manzana para el maestro. Qué lamebotas.
b. el lameculos
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(M)
, la lameculos
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(F)
A word or phrase that is crude, indecent, and generally rejected by society (e.g. fuck).
(vulgar)
Alberto is such a suck-up. He's always bringing lattes and cookies for the boss.Alberto es un tremendo lameculos. Siempre le trae lattes y galletas al jefe.
c. el chupamedias
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(M)
, la chupamedias
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(F)
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Central America: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama
(Central America)
Regionalism used in South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela
(South America)
I am not a suck-up! I just have a good relationship with my boss.¡No soy un chupamedias! Solo tengo una buena relación con mi jefe.
d. el lambón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(M)
, la lambona
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(F)
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Those suck-ups think Gary's going to give them promotions, but he can't stand either of them.Esos lambones creen que Gary los va a ascender, pero no soporta a ninguno de los dos.
e. el pelota
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(M)
, la pelota
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(F)
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
No one likes a suck-up, Vicente. Just do your job, OK?Los pelotas no caen bien a nadie, Vicente. Solo haz tu trabajo, ¿vale?
f. el lambiscón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(M)
, la lambiscona
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(F)
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Ashley is an insufferable suck-up. She's alway congratulating our boss for everything and showering her with praise.Ashley es una lambiscona insoportable. Siempre anda felicitando a nuestra jefa por todo y colmándole de alabanzas.
Copyright © Curiosity Media Inc.
suck up
A transitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and requires a direct object (e.g. Take out the trash.).
transitive verb phrase
1. (liquid)
a. succionar
2. (dust)
a. aspirar
Copyright © 2006 Harrap Publishers Limited
suck up
transitive verb
[+dust, liquid] aspirar
verb:intransitive:plus_adverb
to suck up to sb dar coba a algn
Collins Complete Spanish Electronic Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
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