me saca de quicio
A phrase is a group of words commonly used together (e.g once upon a time).
phrase
1.
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(third person singular)
a. he drives me crazy
Tengo un alumno que es terrible. Me saca de quicio.One of my students is terrible. He drives me crazy.
b. she drives me crazy
Odio a mi vecina. Me saca de quicio.I hate my neighbor. She drives me crazy.
c. it drives me crazy
¿Puedes dejar de silbar? Me saca de quicio.Can you stop whistling? It drives me crazy.
d. drives me crazy
¿Dónde está Damián? Él sabe que la impuntualidad me saca de quicio.Where's Damian? He knows that unpunctuality drives me crazy.
e. he gets on my nerves
Me saca de quicio porque no sabe lo que quiere.He gets on my nerves because he doesn't know what he wants.
f. she gets on my nerves
No me gusta Ana. Me saca de quicio y me hace enojar.I don't like Ana. She gets on my nerves and makes me angry.
g. it gets on my nerves
Me saca de quicio es que me mientan.It gets on my nerves that people lie to me.
h. gets on my nerves
El sonido del vecino martillando la pared me saca de quicio.The sound of the neighbor hammering on the wall gets on my nerves.
2.
A word or phrase used to refer to the second person formal “usted” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. usted).
(formal)
(second person singular)
a. you drive me crazy
Pare de quejarse, señor. Me saca de quicio.Stop complaining, sir. You drive me crazy.
b. you get on my nerves
Me saca de quicio cuando comienza a hacer preguntas estúpidas.You get on my nerves when you start asking stupid questions.
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