dig in
Listen to an audio pronunciation
Listen to an audio pronunciation
dig in(
dihg
 
ihn
)
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to start working)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. ponerse manos a la obra
We've got a lot of work in front of us, so we'd better dig in.Tenemos mucho trabajo por hacer, pues más nos vale que nos pongamos manos a la obra.
2.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to begin eating)
a. atacar
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
The waiter brought the plates of tapas to the table, and everyone dug in.El camarero llevó los platos de tapas a la mesa, y todos atacaron.
3. (to put up a fight)
a. atrincherarse
The soldiers dug in and waited for the enemy.Los soldados se atrincheraron y esperaron al enemigo.
b. defenderse a capa y espada
The rebels dug in, inflicting heavy casualties upon the king's army.Los rebeldes se defendieron a capa y espada, causando muchas bajas al ejército del rey.
A phrase is a group of words commonly used together (e.g once upon a time).
phrase
4.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(imperative)
a. al ataque
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
The croquetas are ready. Dig in, kids!Las croquetas están listas. ¡Al ataque, chicos!
b. a comer
There are burgers, buns, and all the fixings on the table. Dig in everyone!Hay hamburguesas, panecillos y todos las guarniciones en la mesa. ¡Todos a comer!
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dig in
A transitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and requires a direct object (e.g. Take out the trash.).
transitive verb phrase
1. (general)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
to d one's heels inemperrarse
to d oneself inatrincherarse
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
2. (colloquial)
a. ponerse a comer (start eating)
d in!¡a comer!
Copyright © 2006 Harrap Publishers Limited
dig in
verb:intransitive:plus_adverb
1 (eat) meter mano a la comida
dig in! ¡a comer!
2 (also dig o.s. in) (Mil) atrincherarse; (in negotiations, argument) atrincherarse en su postura
there seems to be no agreement and both sides are really digging in what often happens to negotiations of this magnitude # At the last minute, people dig in and progress slows dramatically Typically, when things get really bad, everyone digs in all the more
transitive verb
1 (add) [+fertilizer, compost] añadir al suelo
2 (thrust) [+nails, claws, knife] clavar; hundir
to dig in one's heels mantenerse en sus trece; empecinarse
3 (Mil)
his troops are now well dug in sus tropas se hallan ahora bien atrincheradas
Collins Complete Spanish Electronic Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
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