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Quick answer
"Zambullirse" is a pronominal verb which is often translated as "to dive", and "reñir" is a transitive verb which is often translated as "to tell off". Learn more about the difference between "zambullirse" and "reñir" below.
zambullirse(
sahm
-
boo
-
yeer
-
seh
)
A pronominal verb always uses a reflexive pronoun. (e.g. Te ves cansado.).
1. (to jump into water)
a. to dive
Lisa se zambulló en la parte honda de la piscina y casi se ahoga.Lisa dove into the deep end of the pool and almost drowned.
2. (to submerge oneself)
a. to duck
¡Aguanta la respiración y zambúllete debajo del agua!Hold your breath and duck underwater!
3.
A phrase used as a figure of speech or a word that is symbolic in meaning; metaphorical (e.g. carrot, bean).
(figurative)
(to engross oneself)
a. to submerge oneself
A phrase used as a figure of speech or a word that is symbolic in meaning; metaphorical (e.g. carrot, bean).
(figurative)
Se zambulló en su libro y no se dio cuenta que todos nos fuimos.He submerged himself in his book and didn't notice that we all left.
b. to immerse oneself
A phrase used as a figure of speech or a word that is symbolic in meaning; metaphorical (e.g. carrot, bean).
(figurative)
Viajar te da la oportunidad de zambullirte en una cultura extranjera.Travelling gives you the opportunity to immerse yourself in a foreign culture.
zambullir
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
4. (to submerge in water)
a. to dip
Zambulle las rebanadas de manzana en agua con limón para mantenerlas frescas.Dip the apple slices in water with lemon to keep them from yellowing.
b. to duck
Es mejor zambullir la cabeza en el agua cuando nadas.It's better to duck your head underwater when you swim.
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reñir(
rreh
-
nyeer
)
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1. (to reprimand)
a. to tell off
El vecino riñó a los chicos por hacer mucho ruido en la calle.The neighbor told the kids off for making so much noise in the street.
b. to scold
Ella siempre les riñe como si fueran sus propios hijos.She always scolds them as if they were her own children.
2. (to fight)
a. to wage
Son pocos, pero no les da miedo reñir una batalla para proteger sus tierras.There are only a few of them, but they're not afraid to wage a battle to protect their lands.
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
3. (to disagree)
a. to argue
Los oí riñendo en voz baja en la sala.I heard them arguing in hushed voices in the living room.
b. to fight
Riñó con su madre esta tarde por lo de ayer.She fought with her mom this afternoon about what happened yesterday.
c. to have a falling out
Ya no se hablan desde que riñeron hace un mes.They're not speaking anymore since they had a falling out a month ago.
d. to quarrel
Siempre reñíamos de tonterías cuando éramos pequeños.We always quarreled over stupid things when we were little.
e. to row (United Kingdom)
Están riñendo de alguna chorrada.They're rowing about some silly little thing.
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