Quick answer
"Josh" is a transitive verb which is often translated as "tomar el pelo a", and "drake" is a noun which is often translated as "el pato macho". Learn more about the difference between "josh" and "drake" below.
josh(
jash
)
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1. (to tease)
a. tomar el pelo a
I'm just joshing you. I didn't forget to bring money.Te estoy tomando el pelo. No me olvidé de traer el dinero.
Josh
A proper noun refers to the name of a person, place, or thing.
proper noun
2. (nickname for Joshua)
a. el Josu
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
If you see Josh, tell him to call me.Si ves a Josu, dile que me llame.
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drake
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (animal)
a. el pato macho
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
You can easily tell the drakes by their iridescent green plumage.Es fácil distinguir los patos machos por su plumaje verde irisado.
b. el pato
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
There were several drakes pursuing a female duck.Varios patos perseguían a una pata.
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