Quick answer
"Jilt" is a transitive verb which is often translated as "dejar plantado", and "stand up" is an intransitive verb phrase which is often translated as "levantarse". Learn more about the difference between "jilt" and "stand up" below.
jilt
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1. (general)
a. dejar plantado
On their wedding day, he jilted her.El día de la boda, la dejó plantada.
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stand up
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (to rise)
a. levantarse
Help me to stand up.Ayúdame a levantarme.
b. ponerse de pie
Everyone stood up when the judge walked in.Todos se pusieron de pie cuando entró el juez.
c. pararse
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
He was so weak he couldn't stand up.Estaba tan débil que no podía pararse.
2. (to be standing)
a. estar de pie
I can't stand up for much longer.No aguantaré mucho más estando de pie.
3. (to convince)
a. sostenerse
His theory simply doesn't stand up.Su teoría simplemente no se sostiene.
A transitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and requires a direct object (e.g. Take out the trash.).
transitive verb phrase
4. (to place upright)
a. colocar de pie
I stood the lamp up but it fell over again.Coloqué la lámpara de pie pero volvió a caerse.
5. (to fail to meet)
a. dejar plantado
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
I can't believe she stood me up again!¡No puedo creer que me haya dejado plantada de nuevo!
b. dar plantón a
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
It looks like her boyfriend stood her up.Parece que su novio le dio plantón.
An interjection is a short utterance that expresses emotion, hesitation, or protest (e.g. Wow!).
6. (imperative; used to address one person)
a. levántate
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Stand up so I can see how those pants fit.Levántate para que vea cómo te queda el pantalón.
b. pónte de pie
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Stand up when I'm talking to you!¡Pónte de pie cuando te hablo!
c. párate
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Stand up when the teacher comes in!¡Párate cuando entra el profesor!
7. (imperative; used to address multiple people)
a. levántense (plural)
Stand up now!¡Levántense ahora mismo!
b. pónganse de pie (plural)
Stand up for the photo.Pónganse de pie para la foto.
c. párense (plural)
Stand up and get ready to sing!¡Párense para empezar a cantar!
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