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Quick answer
"Ill" is an adjective which is often translated as "enfermo", and "sick" is an adjective which is also often translated as "enfermo". Learn more about the difference between "ill" and "sick" below.
ill(
ihl
)
An adjective is a word that describes a noun (e.g. the big dog).
1. (sick)
a. enfermo
He felt ill after eating the shrimp.Se sintió enfermo después de comer los camarones.
b. malo (colloquial)
He's ill and won't be going to school today.Está malo y no irá a la escuela hoy.
2. (bad)
a. malo
She's said to be a woman of ill repute, but I think she's misunderstood.Dicen que es una mujer de mala reputación, pero creo que es incomprendida.
An adverb is a word that describes a verb, an adjective, or other adverbs (e.g. to run quickly, very tired).
3. (poorly)
a. mal
It is a lack of respect to speak ill of the dead.Es una falta de respeto hablar mal de los difuntos.
4. (scarcely)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
I can ill afford to eat in a restaurant while I'm unemployed.No me puedo dar el lujo de comer en un restaurante mientras estoy sin empleo.
You can ill afford to make another mistake now that you're on probation.Mal puedes permitirte cometer otro error ahora que estás en libertad condicional.
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
5. (problem)
a. el mal
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Don't allow the ills of the world to diminish the good you have in your hearts.No permitan que los males del mundo disminuyan el bien que tienen en sus corazones.
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sick(
sihk
)
An adjective is a word that describes a noun (e.g. the big dog).
1. (ill)
a. enfermo
I haven't been sick for a long time.Hace mucho tiempo que no estoy enfermo.
b. malo
I've been sick for a week now.Llevo una semana malo ya.
2. (nauseated)
a. mareado
I feel a bit sick. I think I need to sit down for a bit.Me siento algo mareado. Creo que debería sentarme un rato.
3. (fed up; used with "of")
a. harto de
I'm sick of putting up with them.Estoy harta de aguantarlos.
4. (gruesome)
a. morboso
Uncle Armando has a sick fascination with traffic accidents.El tío Armando tiene una fascinación morbosa con los accidentes de tránsito.
5. (inappropriate)
a. de mal gusto
She was quite offended with his sick joke.Ese chiste suyo de mal gusto la ofendió.
6.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(cool)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. genial
My brother bought a sick bike this weekend.Mi hermano se compró una moto genial este fin de semana.
b. chévere
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Look, that car is super sick.Mira, ese carro está súper chévere.
c. padrísimo
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
My uncle lives in a sick house in Polanco.Mi tío vive en una casa padrísimo en Polanco.
d. bacán
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela
(South America)
That's a sick watch, dude.Está bacán tu reloj, amigo.
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
7.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(vomit) (United Kingdom)
a. el vómito
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
There was a pool of sick in the toilet.Había un charco de vómito en el inodoro.
b. el devuelto
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
What is that you're eating? It looks like a plate of sick.¿Qué estás comiendo? Parece un plato de devuelto.
A plural noun indicates that there is more than one person, place, thing, or idea.
plural noun
8. (ill people)
a. los enfermos
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
This religious order helps the sick.Esta orden religiosa ayuda a los enfermos.
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