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Quick answer
"Grind" is a transitive verb which is often translated as "moler", and "mince" is a transitive verb which is often translated as "picar". Learn more about the difference between "grind" and "mince" below.
grind(
graynd
)
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1. (to crush)
a. moler
Use a blender to grind the coffee beans into a powder.Muele los granos de café en la licuadora hasta que se hagan polvo.
b. machacar
Grind salt, pepper, oregano, and basil with a mortar.Machaca sal, pimienta, orégano y albahaca en un mortero.
c. pulverizar
This mill is used to grind wheat, rye, and rice.Este molino se utiliza para pulverizar trigo, centeno y arroz.
2. (to chop meat finely)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. moler
I'm grinding pork to make homemade hamburgers.Estoy moliendo carne de cerdo para hacer hamburguesas caseras.
b. triturar
Grind the meat, add the spices, and let it marinate for an hour.Tritura la carne, añade las especias y déjala marinar por una hora.
c. picar (River Plate)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
If you don't have a food processor to grind the meat, you can chop it finely with a knife.Si no tienes un procesador de alimentos para picar la carne, puedes cortarla en trocitos con un cuchillo.
3. (to clench)
a. rechinar (teeth)
I have to sleep with a mouth guard so I don't grind my teeth while I'm asleep.Tengo que dormir con un protector bucal para no rechinar los dientes mientras duermo.
4. (to sharpen)
a. afilar
Grind the blade to remove all dents.Afila la cuchilla para quitarle todas las mellas.
5. (to polish)
a. pulir
Cut the wine bottle and grind it to make a glass.Corta la botella de vino y púlela para hacer un vaso.
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
6. (to move with friction)
a. rechinar
The driver slammed his foot on the brake and the wheels ground.El conductor frenó con fuerza y las llantas rechinaron.
b. chirriar
The chair ground loudly against the floor when Diana moved it.La silla chirrió con fuerza en el piso cuando Diana la arrastró.
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
7.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(drudgery)
a. el trabajo pesado
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
How's your new job? - It's a grind, but it's good money.¿Qué tal tu nuevo puesto? - Es trabajo pesado, pero paga bien.
b. el rollo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
This math homework is a grind. I need a break.Esta tarea de matemáticas es un rollo. Necesito un descanso.
c. la rutina diaria
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Sometimes I get bored with the daily grind.A veces me aburre la rutina diaria.
8.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(diligent student)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. el empollón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la empollona
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Adele is a grind. She studies all day and never wants to go out with us.Adele es una empollona. Se la pasa estudiando todo el día y nunca quiere salir con nosotros.
b. el matado
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la matada
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
I assigned the task to Matt. He is a grind so he will complete it on time.Le asigné la tarea a Matt. Es un matado así que la terminará a tiempo.
c. el traga
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la traga
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(River Plate)
Laura is a grind. She gets the highest grade in every assignment.Laura es una traga. Saca la calificación más alta en todos los trabajos.
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mince
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1. (to chop)
a. picar
After mincing the green peppers, add them to the frying pan.Después de picar los pimientos verdes, échalos a la sartén.
2. (to grind meat) (United Kingdom)
a. moler
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
If you don't mince the meat properly, your hamburguer won't have an even consistency.Si no mueles bien la carne, la hamburguesa no tendrá una consistencia uniforme.
b. picar (River Plate)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Joan and I minced the pork to make longaniza.Joan y yo picamos la carne de cerdo para hacer la longaniza.
3. (to made less harsh)
a. medir
Our boss doesn't mince his words; if you're not on point, you'll hear about it.Nuestra jefa no mide las palabras; si no estás dando la talla, te lo dirá.
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
4. (culinary) (United Kingdom)
a. la carne molida
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Once the mince is browned, add onions and garlic.Una vez que esté dorada la carne molida, incorpora la cebolla y el ajo.
b. la carne picada
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(River Plate)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Have you put the mince into the pies yet?¿Ya has puesto la carne picada en las empanadas?
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
5. (to strut)
a. caminar con afectación
A beautiful blonde minced across the room and cut us all in line.Una hermosa rubia caminó con afectación a través del salón y se saltó la fila.
6.
A word or phrase that is no longer used in contemporary language and is recognized as being from another era (e.g. thou).
(archaic)
(to speak affectedly)
a. hablar remilgadamente
Everyone had grown tired of listening to Mary mince about the knights she saw at the palace.Todos estaban hartos de oír a Mary hablar remilgadamente de los caballeros que vio en el palacio.
Copyright © Curiosity Media Inc.
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