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Quick answer
"Go away" is an intransitive verb phrase which is often translated as "irse", and "rain" is an impersonal verb which is often translated as "llover". Learn more about the difference between "go away" and "rain" below.
go away(
go
 
uh
-
wey
)
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (to leave)
a. irse
Why won't those kids go away?¿Por qué no se van esos chicos?
b. marcharse
When did they go away?¿Cuándo se marcharon?
2. (to dissipate)
a. desaparecer
The bad odor will go away in a few minutes.El mal olor desaparecerá en unos minutos.
3. (to take a vacation)
a. irse de vacaciones
We're going away this weekend.Este fin de semana nos vamos de vacaciones.
A phrase is a group of words commonly used together (e.g once upon a time).
phrase
4. (imperative; used to address one person)
a. vete
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Go away, kid!¡Vete, niño!
b. lárgate
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Just go away! I don't want to talk to you anymore.¡Lárgate ya! No quiero hablar más contigo.
c. váyase
A word or phrase used to refer to the second person formal “usted” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. usted).
(formal)
(singular)
Go away before the boss comes back. If he sees you here, he'll fire you.Váyase antes de que vuelva el jefe. Si lo ve aquí, lo despide.
d. lárguese
A word or phrase used to refer to the second person formal “usted” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. usted).
(formal)
(singular)
Go away. You have no business here.Lárguese. Aquí no pinta nada.
5. (imperative; used to address multiple people)
a. váyanse (plural)
Please go away! You're all making too much noise.¡Váyanse, por favor! Están haciendo mucho ruido.
b. lárguense (plural)
Go away or I'll call the police!¡Lárguense o llamo a la policía!
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rain(
reyn
)
An impersonal verb is a verb with no apparent subject (e.g. Llueve en España.).
1. (weather)
a. llover
If it keeps raining, we can't go to the park.Si sigue lloviendo, no podemos ir al parque.
Sam took the umbrella because it's raining.Sam se llevó el paraguas porque está lloviendo.
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
2. (weather)
a. la lluvia
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
The rain made the air smell fresh and clean.La lluvia hizo que el aire oliera fresco y limpio.
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
3. (to pour)
a. hacer caer
He rained candy and balloons on the crowd.Hizo caer dulces y globos sobre la multitud.
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