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Quick answer
"Get up" is an intransitive verb phrase which is often translated as "levantarse", and "stand up" is an intransitive verb phrase which is also often translated as "levantarse". Learn more about the difference between "get up" and "stand up" below.
get up(
gehd
 
uhp
)
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (to leave one's bed)
a. levantarse
I get up at 7 am every day.Me levanto a las 7 am cada día.
2. (to stand)
a. levantarse
Children, please get up off the floor.Niños, levántense del suelo por favor.
b. pararse
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
He got up to give the seat to an old lady.Se paró para dejarle el asiento a una señora mayor.
3. (to climb up)
a. subir
He got up on the podium to receive the medal.Subió al podio para recibir la medalla.
4. (to become stronger)
a. levantarse (wind)
A strong wind got up and the clouds started moving very fast.Se levantó un viento muy fuerte y las nubes empezaron a moverse muy rápido.
b. embravecerse (sea)
The sea had gotten up and the boat was swaying back and forth.El mar se había embravecido y el barco se balanceaba hacia atrás y adelante.
c. avivarse (fire)
He threw some wood on the fire and it got up.Lanzó leña al fuego y éste se avivó.
5. (to dress up)
a. ataviarse
He got up in a tuxedo.Se atavió con un esmoquin.
A transitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and requires a direct object (e.g. Take out the trash.).
transitive verb phrase
6. (to get out of bed)
a. levantar
Go get your brother up.Vete a levantar a tu hermano.
7. (to raise)
a. levantar
We got the body up between the three of us.Entre los tres levantamos el cuerpo.
8. (to erect)
a. levantar (building)
They are getting several buildings up in the square.Están levantando varios edificios en la plaza.
b. montar (tent)
He got the tent up with incredible ease.Montó la tienda con una facilidad pasmosa.
9. (to gather)
a. reunir
I couldn't get up enough strength to break the glass.No pude reunir la fuerza necesaria para romper el cristal.
10. (to prepare)
a. organizar
They got up an incredible team in a matter of two years.Organizaron un equipo increíble en cuestión de dos años.
11. (to stimulate)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
I don't want to get your hopes up.No quiero que te hagas demasiadas ilusiones.
Walking to the restaurant will get our appetite up.Andar hasta el restaurante nos ayudará a abrir el apetito.
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stand up(
stahnd
 
uhp
)
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (to rise)
a. levantarse
Help me to stand up.Ayúdame a levantarme.
b. ponerse de pie
Everyone stood up when the judge walked in.Todos se pusieron de pie cuando entró el juez.
c. pararse
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
He was so weak he couldn't stand up.Estaba tan débil que no podía pararse.
2. (to be standing)
a. estar de pie
I can't stand up for much longer.No aguantaré mucho más estando de pie.
3. (to convince)
a. sostenerse
His theory simply doesn't stand up.Su teoría simplemente no se sostiene.
A transitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and requires a direct object (e.g. Take out the trash.).
transitive verb phrase
4. (to place upright)
a. colocar de pie
I stood the lamp up but it fell over again.Coloqué la lámpara de pie pero volvió a caerse.
5. (to fail to meet)
a. dejar plantado
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
I can't believe she stood me up again!¡No puedo creer que me haya dejado plantada de nuevo!
b. dar plantón a
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
It looks like her boyfriend stood her up.Parece que su novio le dio plantón.
An interjection is a short utterance that expresses emotion, hesitation, or protest (e.g. Wow!).
6. (imperative; used to address one person)
a. levántate
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Stand up so I can see how those pants fit.Levántate para que vea cómo te queda el pantalón.
b. pónte de pie
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Stand up when I'm talking to you!¡Pónte de pie cuando te hablo!
c. párate
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Stand up when the teacher comes in!¡Párate cuando entra el profesor!
7. (imperative; used to address multiple people)
a. levántense (plural)
Stand up now!¡Levántense ahora mismo!
b. pónganse de pie (plural)
Stand up for the photo.Pónganse de pie para la foto.
c. párense (plural)
Stand up and get ready to sing!¡Párense para empezar a cantar!
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