Listen to an audio pronunciation
vs
Listen to an audio pronunciation
Quick answer
"Get drunk" is an intransitive verb phrase which is often translated as "emborracharse", and "drink" is a transitive verb which is often translated as "beber". Learn more about the difference between "get drunk" and "drink" below.
get drunk(
geht
 
druhngk
)
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
1. (to become intoxicated)
a. emborracharse
Some people experience memory loss when they get drunk.Algunas personas sufren de pérdida de la memoria cuando se emborrachan.
A phrase is a group of words commonly used together (e.g once upon a time).
phrase
2. (imperative)
a. emborráchate
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Congrats! You got the job! Celebrate and get drunk!¡Felicitaciones, conseguiste el trabajo!¡Festeja y emborráchate!
Copyright © Curiosity Media Inc.
drink(
drihngk
)
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1. (to imbibe)
a. beber
To prevent dehydration, drink plenty of water.Para evitar la deshidratación, bebe mucha agua.
b. tomar
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
I have only ever seen him drink Coca Cola.Yo solo lo he visto tomar Coca Cola.
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
2. (to consume liquid)
a. beber
Drinking enough cleanses your body of toxins.Beber suficientemente limpia el cuerpo de toxinas.
b. tomar
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Would you like anything to drink before ordering food?¿Les gustaría algo de tomar antes de pedir la comida?
3. (to consume alcohol)
a. beber
In this country you cannot drink before you turn 21.En este país no se puede beber antes de cumplir 21 años.
b. tomar
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
I stopped drinking two hours before driving home.Dejé de tomar dos horas antes de manejar a casa.
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
4. (beverage)
a. la bebida
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
His favorite drink is Dr. Pepper without ice.Su bebida preferida es el Dr. Pepper sin hielo.
5. (alcoholic beverage)
a. la bebida
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A party isn't a party without drinks.Una fiesta no es una fiesta sin bebida.
b. la copa
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
We're going to have some drinks after work.Vamos a tomar unas copas después del trabajo.
c. el trago
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
It only takes one drink to knock him out for the night.Solo necesita un trago para dejarlo inconsciente el resto de la noche.
d. el palo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Puerto Rico
(Puerto Rico)
Regionalism used in Venezuela
(Venezuela)
They went to the bar to have a few drinks.Se fueron al bar para echarse unos palos.
Copyright © Curiosity Media Inc.
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.  |  Ver en español
SOCIAL NETWORKS
APPS