Quick answer
"Fussiness" is a noun which is often translated as "la meticulosidad", and "fuss" is a noun which is often translated as "el escándalo". Learn more about the difference between "fussiness" and "fuss" below.
fussiness
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (thoroughness)
a. la meticulosidad
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Thanks to our principal investigator's fussiness, our experiment yielded accurate results.Gracias a la meticulosidad de nuestro investigador principal, nuestro experimento obtuvo resultados precisos.
2. (elaborate detail)
a. lo recargado
Because of the fussiness of the apartment's design, the guests constantly worried about ruining something.Debido a lo recargado del diseño del apartamento, los invitados constantemente temían arruinar algo.
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fuss(
fuhs
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (commotion)
a. el escándalo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Jimmy kicked up a real fuss and refused to go to bed.Jimmy armó un menudo escándalo y se negó a acostarse.
b. el alboroto
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
The secretary always makes a fuss if you mess with her pens.La secretaria siempre hace un alboroto si revuelves sus plumas.
c. el número
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
What a fuss your friend kicked up when you wouldn't lend him money!¡Vaya número montó tu amigo cuando no le quisiste prestar dinero!
d. el lío
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Rebecca knew if she made a fuss, the manager would give her her money back.Rebecca sabía que si armaba un lío, el gerente le devolvería su dinero.
2. (excessive affection)
a. mimar
Carlos has no interest in people making a fuss over him on his birthday.A Carlos no le interesa que lo mimen el día de su cumpleaños.
b. consentir
Stefanie couldn't get any rest with relatives coming over and making a fuss over the baby.Stefanie no lograba descansar por los familiares que iban a consentir a la bebé.
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
3. (to complain)
a. preocuparse
Will's wife is always fussing about how things are put away in the kitchen.La mujer de Will siempre se preocupa por cómo se guardan las cosas en la cocina.
4. (to be restless)
a. estar inquieto
The baby was crying and fussing the entire plane ride.El bebé lloró y estuvo inquieto durante todo el vuelo.
5. (to fiddle with; often used with "with")
a. juguetear
Sara fussing with her earrings makes me nervous.Sara jugueteando con sus aretes me pone nervioso.
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