Quick answer
"Fumble" is an intransitive verb which is often translated as "hurgar", and "grope" is an intransitive verb which is often translated as "andar a tientas". Learn more about the difference between "fumble" and "grope" below.
fumble(
fuhm
-
buhl
)
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
1. (to rummage)
a. hurgar
He fumbled in his jacket pocket and produced a key.Hurgó en el bolsillo de su saco y extrajo una llave.
2. (to search clumsily; used with "for")
a. buscar a tientas
I put my hand out in the dark, fumbling for the matches.Extendí la mano en la oscuridad, buscando a tientas los fósforos.
3. (to use one's hands clumsily)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
He fumbles with the remote control. The buttons are too small.No puede manejar bien el control remoto. Los botones son demasiado pequeños.
She was fumbling with her seat belt, and couldn't get it to fasten.Trataba torpemente de abrocharse el cinturón y no conseguía hacerlo.
4. (to express oneself clumsily)
a. titubear
When asked to explain himself, the schoolboy fumbled helplessly for words.Cuando se le pidió una explicación, el niño titubeó, tratando en vano de encontrarla.
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
5. (sports)
a. dejar caer
Smith fumbled the ball before throwing home.Smith dejó caer la bola antes de lanzar al home.
b. escaparse
Richards fumbled a pass, allowing Hellmann a shot at goal.A Richards se le escapó un pase, lo que permitió a Hellmann tirar al arco.
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
6. (sports)
a. el fumble
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(US football)
Castellanos recovered a fumble to make a touchdown.Castellanos recuperó un fumble para anotar un touchdown.
Copyright © Curiosity Media Inc.
grope(
grop
)
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
1. (to feel around)
a. andar a tientas
In this game, the blindfolded person has to grope around the room trying to find the others.En este juego, la persona con los ojos vendados tiene que andar a tientas por la habitación buscando a los demás.
b. tantear
He was groping with his feet, trying to get a foothold.Tanteaba con los pies, intentando encontrar un punto de apoyo.
2. (to feel for; used with "for")
a. buscar a tientas
I got out of bed, groping for the light switch.Me levanté y busqué el interruptor a tientas.
3.
A phrase used as a figure of speech or a word that is symbolic in meaning; metaphorical (e.g. carrot, bean).
(figurative)
(to search for; used with "for")
a. esforzarse por encontrar
She was groping for words to describe the horrors she had witnessed.Se esforzaba por encontrar palabras que pudieran describir los horrores que había presenciado.
4.
A phrase used as a figure of speech or a word that is symbolic in meaning; metaphorical (e.g. carrot, bean).
(figurative)
(to struggle)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
I was groping in the dark, trying to discover why I felt the way I did.Yo daba palos de ciego, intentando de descubrir por qué me sentía así.
We are still groping to understand what this decision will mean for us.Seguimos en la oscuridad, tratando de comprender las consecuencias que esta decisión tendrá para nosotros.
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
5.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to fondle)
a. manosear
There's an old lech in the office who gropes all the women.Hay un viejo verde en la oficina que manosea a todas las mujeres.
b. meter mano a
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
I hate it when someone tries to grope me on the subway.Odio que alguien intente meterme mano en el metro.
c. toquetear
A drunken man at the party tried to grope her.En la fiesta, un hombre borracho intentó toquetearla.
6. (to find by feeling)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
I groped my way back to the tent in the dark.Volví a la tienda a tientas en la oscuridad.
Sam groped his way along the ledge, refusing to look down.Sam avanzó a tientas por la cornisa, resistiéndose a mirar hacia abajo.
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
7.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(act of fondling)
a. el toqueteo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Apart from the odd grope at a party, he didn't have any experience with women.Aparte de algún toqueteo que otro en una fiesta, no tenía ninguna experiencia con las mujeres.
b.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
John's parents returned home and caught them having a grope on the sofa.Los padres de John volvieron a casa y los pillaron metiéndose mano en el sofá.
We used to take advantage of the darkness in the movie theater to have a grope.Aprovechábamos la oscuridad del cine para toquetearnos.
Copyright © Curiosity Media Inc.
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.  |  Ver en español
SOCIAL NETWORKS
APPS