Quick answer
"Follow me" is a phrase which is often translated as "sígueme", and "come" is an intransitive verb which is often translated as "venir". Learn more about the difference between "follow me" and "come" below.
follow me(
fa
-
lo
 
mi
)
A phrase is a group of words commonly used together (e.g once upon a time).
phrase
1. (imperative; used to address one person)
a. sígueme
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
If you don't know the way, follow me in the car.Si no sabes el camino, sígueme en el coche.
b. sígame
A word or phrase used to refer to the second person formal “usted” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. usted).
(formal)
(singular)
Follow me, madam! I'll show you to your room.¡Sígame, señora! Yo le muestro dónde está su habitación.
2. (imperative; used to address multiple people)
a. síganme
Everyone follow me, please!¡Síganme todos, por favor!
An intransitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and does not require a direct object (e.g. Everybody please stand up.).
intransitive verb phrase
3. (to move behind me)
a. seguirme
I'm sure someone was following me on my way home.Estoy convencida de que alguien me seguía de camino a casa.
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come(
kuhm
)
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
1. (to move toward)
a. venir
Come over here and show me your drawing.Ven aquí y enséñame tu dibujo.
b. acercarse
Come and talk to Santa.Acércate y habla con Santa.
2. (to reach a destination)
a. llegar
He always comes to work late and leaves early.Siempre llega tarde al trabajo y se va temprano.
b. venir
They came to class without books or pens.Vinieron a la clase sin libros ni plumas.
c. ir
All right! I'm coming!¡Bueno, ya voy!
3. (to accompany)
a. ir
I can come with you after work if you like.Podría ir contigo después del trabajo si quieres.
4. (to occur)
a. llegar
Hurricane season came later that year.La época de huracanes llegó un poco más tarde ese año.
5. (to be packaged)
a. venir
The crackers come in a box.Las galletas vienen en una caja.
6. (to reach)
a. llegar
Those pants don't even come to your ankles.Ese pantalón ni te llega a los tobillos.
7. (to reach a condition)
a. llegar a
I have come to understand that you can't force things.He llegado a comprender que no puedes forzar las cosas.
8.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to have an orgasm)
a. correrse
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
He took a long time to come.Tardó mucho en correrse.
b. acabar
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Did you come already?¿Ya acabaste?
c. venirse
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
She came really quickly.Se vino muy rápido.
9. (to become)
a. hacerse
Her dream of being a singer never came true.Su sueño de ser cantante nunca se hizo realidad.
b.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
The button has come loose, and I can't find it.El botón se ha soltado, y no puedo encontrarlo.
When the knot came undone, the sail fell into the sea.Al deshacerse el nudo, la vela cayó al mar.
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