Quick answer
"Flunked" is a form of "flunk", a transitive verb which is often translated as "reprobar". Learn more about "flunk" below.
flunk
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to fail)
a. reprobar
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
You flunked the test because you waited until the day before to try and learn everything.Reprobaste el examen porque esperaste hasta el día anterior para tratar de aprender todo.
b. suspender
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
If I don't flunk any classes, my parents will buy me a video game.Si no suspendo ninguna de mis clases, mis padres me comprarán un videojuego.
c. tronar
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Central America: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama
(Central America)
Regionalism used in Cuba
(Cuba)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
Paula flunked the test because she only read the first chapter of the book.Paula tronó el examen porque solo leyó el primer capítulo del libro.
d. rajar
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Bolivia
(Bolivia)
Regionalism used in Colombia
(Colombia)
I flunked physics last semester.Rajé física el semestre pasado.
e. jalar
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Ecuador
(Ecuador)
If I flunk another test my dad will be mad.Si jalo otro examen mi papá se va a enojar.
f. catear
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
You need to study so you don't flunk chemistry.Tienes que estudiar para no catear química.
2.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to give a failing grade)
a. reprobar
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Mr. Dunn flunked everyone who cheated.El Sr. Dunn reprobó a todos los que copiaron.
b. suspender
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
It's not the first time the Spanish teacher flunks a student.No es la primera vez que el maestro de español suspende a un estudiante.
c. catear
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
The history teacher flunked Ivan with an F.La maestra de historia cateó a Iván con un 5.
d. tronar
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Central America: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama
(Central America)
Regionalism used in Cuba
(Cuba)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
The professor flunked those who plagiarized part of their essay.El profesor tronó a los que plagiaron partes de su ensayo.
e. bochar
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(River Plate)
If you're absent again, the teacher will flunk you.Si vuelves a faltar, la maestra te va a bochar.
f. jalar
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Peru
(Peru)
Mrs. Jenny is really easy. She's never flunked any of her students.La maestra Jenny es un barco. Nunca ha jalado a ninguno de sus estudiantes.
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
3.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to fail)
a. reprobar
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
Are you serious? Did you flunk again?¿Es en serio? ¿Reprobaste otra vez?
b. tronar
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Central America: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama
(Central America)
Regionalism used in Cuba
(Cuba)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
I got an F on the test, which means I flunked.Saqué 5 en el examen, lo que significa que troné.
c. rajar
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Bolivia
(Bolivia)
Regionalism used in Colombia
(Colombia)
If Mary flunks again, she's out of the school.Si Mary raja otra vez, está fuera del colegio.
d. jalar
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Ecuador
(Ecuador)
I don't understand why I flunked if I studied so hard.No entiendo por qué jalé si estudié tanto.
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