Quick answer
"Seeking" is a form of "seek", a transitive verb which is often translated as "buscar". "Finding" is a noun which is often translated as "el descubrimiento". Learn more about the difference between "finding" and "seeking" below.
finding(
fayn
-
dihng
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (discovery)
a. el descubrimiento
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Archaeologists made a striking finding about life in Ancient Egypt.Los arqueólogos hicieron un descubrimiento asombroso sobre la vida en el Antiguo Egipto.
b. el hallazgo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Recent scientific findings indicate that coffee improves performance at the gym.Según hallazgos científicos recientes, tomar café mejora tu rendimiento en el gimnasio.
2. (conclusion)
a. el resultado
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Scientists are still discussing the findings of the investigation.Los científicos todavía están debatiendo los resultados de la investigación.
3. (legal)
a. el fallo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
The finding of the judge is firmly based on the evidence.El fallo del juez está firmemente fundamentado en las pruebas.
b. el veredicto
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Now she wants to appeal against the finding of the jury.Ahora ella quiere apelar contra el veredicto del jurado.
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seek(
sik
)
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1. (to look for)
a. buscar
The prime minister sent envoys to seek allies.El primer ministro envió emisarios a buscar aliados.
2. (to ask for)
a. pedir
It is not too late to seek help.No es demasiado tarde para pedir ayuda.
3. (to try)
a. intentar
Napoleon sought to conquer all of Europe.Napoleón intentaba conquistar toda Europa.
b. tratar
They are seeking to prevent the spread of the disease.Están tratando de impedir que se extienda la epidemia.
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
4. (to search; used with "for")
a. buscar
I feel as if I've been seeking for you all my life.Siento que te he estado buscando toda la vida.
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