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Quick answer
"Envases" is a form of "envasar", a transitive verb which is often translated as "to package". "Latas" is a form of "latir", an intransitive verb which is often translated as "to beat". Learn more about the difference between "envases" and "latas" below.
envasar(
ehm
-
bah
-
sahr
)
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1. (to put in a container)
a. to package
Envasamos nuestros productos en varios tipos diferentes de recipientes.We package our products in a number of different types of container.
b. to pack
Este método permite envasar la miel con mayor rapidez.This method allows the honey to be packed more quickly.
c. to bottle (in a bottle)
Esta máquina se utiliza para envasar las bebidas.This machine is used for bottling drinks.
d. to can (in a can)
Con este aparato puedes envasar diferentes tipos de alimentos.Different kinds of food can be canned using this device.
e.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
El adhesivo viene envasado en tubos.The adhesive comes in tubes.
Estas conservas vienen en tarros de cristal.These preserves come in glass jars.
2.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to drink excessively)
a. to knock back
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Jaime y sus amigos envasaron varias botellas de vino anoche.Jaime and his friends knocked back several bottles of wine last night.
3.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to spear)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
a. to stab
El bandido envasó a su víctima con un puñal.The bandit stabbed his victim with a knife.
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latir(
lah
-
teer
)
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
1. (to pulsate)
a. to beat (heart)
Estaba muy nervioso y el corazón me latía muy rápido.I was really nervous and my heart was beating very fast.
b. to throb
El hielo hizo que la herida de la pierna volviera a latir.The ice made the wound on my leg start throbbing again.
2. (to emit a short, harsh cry)
a. to bark
Tiene que haber alguien afuera porque el perro no para de latir.There must be someone outside because the dog won't stop barking.
3.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to suspect)
Regionalism used in Costa Rica
(Costa Rica)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
Regionalism used in Nicaragua
(Nicaragua)
Regionalism used in South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela
(South America)
a. to have a feeling
Me late que no llega a tiempo por causa de la nieve.I have a feeling that she'll be late because of the snow.
4.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to seem like a good idea)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
a. to sound good to
Vamos a Coyoacán a tomar un café. - Me late.Let's go to Coyoacan and get coffee. - Sounds good to me.
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