Quick answer
"Delatar" is a transitive verb which is often translated as "to denounce", and "chivarse" is a pronominal verb which is often translated as "to tell". Learn more about the difference between "delatar" and "chivarse" below.
delatar(
deh
-
lah
-
tahr
)
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1. (to accuse)
a. to denounce
El ladrón arrestado delató a sus cómplices.The thief under arrest denounced his accomplices.
b. to inform on
Delató a muchos de sus camaradas bajo tortura.He informed on many of his comrades under torture.
2. (to show)
a. to give away
Su mirada delataba su miedo.Her look gave away her fear.
b. to betray
Esa actitud tan agresiva que tiene delata una gran inseguridad.Such an aggresive attitude as he has betrays great insecurity.
delatarse
A pronominal verb always uses a reflexive pronoun. (e.g. Te ves cansado.).
3. (to reveal information)
a. to give oneself away
Se delató diciendo cosas que solo la policía sabía.She gave herself away saying things only the police knew.
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chivarse
A pronominal verb always uses a reflexive pronoun. (e.g. Te ves cansado.).
1.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to snitch)
a. to tell
Pablito, ¿fuiste tú el que se chivó al profesor que yo me comí su manzana?Pablito, was it you who told the teacher I ate his apple?
b. to squeal
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Los cómplices de Pedro temían que se chivara a las autoridades.Pedro's accomplices feared that he would squeal to the authorities.
c. to split
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(United Kingdom)
No vayas a chivarte a mamá que Danny es mi novio.You're not going to split on me to mum that Danny is my boyfriend, are you?
d. to grass
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(United Kingdom)
Tony sospecha que fue la novia del nuevo conductor quien se chivó a la policía.Tony suspects that it was the new driver's girlfriend who grassed to the police.
2.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to get upset)
Regionalism used in Argentina
(Argentina)
Regionalism used in Guatemala
(Guatemala)
Regionalism used in Venezuela
(Venezuela)
a. to get annoyed
No te chives por eso que no es mayor cosa.Don't get annoyed by that! It's not worth it.
chivar
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
3.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to upset)
Regionalism used in the Caribbean: Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico
(Caribbean)
Regionalism used in Guatemala
(Guatemala)
a. to annoy
A Laura le gusta chivar a los profesores con sus preguntas impertinentes.Laura likes to annoy the teachers with her impertinent questions.
Copyright © Curiosity Media Inc.
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