Quick answer
"Court" is a noun which is often translated as "el tribunal", and "street" is a noun which is often translated as "la calle". Learn more about the difference between "court" and "street" below.
court(
kawrt
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (legal)
a. el tribunal
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
The court will decide who should pay for the expenses.El tribunal decidirá quién tendrá que pagar los gastos.
We might have to take this matter to court.Puede que tengamos que llevar este asunto ante un tribunal.
b. la corte
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
The Supreme Court will announce its decision this week.La Corte Suprema dará a conocer su decisión esta semana.
2. (entourage)
a. el corte
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
The king and his court went hunting foxes.El rey y su corte se fueron a la caza de zorros.
3. (sports)
a. la cancha
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
My apartment complex has a tennis court.Mi complejo residencial tiene una cancha de tenis.
b. la pista
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Wimbledon is played on a grass court.Wimbledon se disputa en una pista de hierba.
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
4. (to attract something)
a. buscarse
She is courting a financial disaster by investing without information about the market.Se está buscando un desastre financiero al invertir sin información sobre el mercado.
With those new taxes, the government is courting the wrath of the people.Con esos impuestos nuevos, el gobierno se está buscando la ira de la población.
5. (to woo, pursue romantically)
a. cortejar
The prince courted the maiden in this tale.Un príncipe cortejaba a la doncella en este cuento.
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
6. (archaic; to see each other romantically)
a. estar de novios
They have been courting for ages.Han estado de novios toda la vida.
b. noviar
Regionalism used in Argentina
(Argentina)
You're too young to be courting!¡Eres demasiado joven para estar noviando!
c. pololear (colloquial)
Regionalism used in Chile
(Chile)
How long will you court before you get married?¿Cuánto tiempo van a pololear antes de casarse?
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street(
strit
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (road)
a. la calle
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
He's lived on the same street his entire life.Ha vivido en la misma calle su vida entera.
2. (position or level) (United Kingdom)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
As a writer, he's not in the same street as his father.Como escritor, no está a la altura de su padre.
When it comes to technology, Japan is streets ahead of us.En lo que se refiere a la tecnología, Japón nos lleva mucha ventaja.
An adjective is a word that describes a noun (e.g. the big dog).
3. (related to the streets)
a. callejero
We love to go to the street market on the weekends.Nos encanta ir al mercado callejero los fines de semana.
b. de la calle
He sees himself as a street photographer.Se considera a sí mismo un fotógrafo de la calle.
c. urbano
These two venues have been part of London street culture for decades now.Estos dos locales son parte de la cultura urbana londinense desde hace décadas.
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