Quick answer
"Cinnamon" is a noun which is often translated as "la canela", and "sugar" is a noun which is often translated as "el/la azúcar". Learn more about the difference between "cinnamon" and "sugar" below.
cinnamon(
sih
-
nuh
-
mihn
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (spice)
a. la canela
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
I like to add a pinch of cinnamon to the pancake batter.Me gusta añadir un poco de canela a la masa de los panqueques.
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sugar(
shoog
-
uhr
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (culinary)
a. el azúcar
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
, la azúcar
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
I rarely add sugar to my coffee.Rara vez agrego azúcar al café.
Where is the sugar that I bought?¿Dónde está la azúcar que compré?
2.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(term of endearment)
a. el cariño
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Sugar, will you help grandma?Cariño, ¿le ayudas a tu abuelita?
b. el cielo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Come on, sugar! If we don't hurry, the train will leave us behind.¡Vamos, cielo! Si no nos apuramos, el tren nos va a dejar atrás.
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
3. (to add sugar to)
a. echar azucar a
Sugar the yams, then bake them at 400 degrees for about 20 minutes.Échale azúcar a los camotes, y luego hornéalos a 400 grados por unos 20 minutos.
b. azucarar
For a healthier breakfast, you shouldn't sugar your cereal.Para un desayuno más sano, se recomienda no azucarar los cereales.
An interjection is a short utterance that expresses emotion, hesitation, or protest (e.g. Wow!).
4.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(used to express annoyance) (United Kingdom)
a. ¡Miércoles!
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Sugar! I forgot my keys.¡Miércoles! Se me olvidaron las llaves.
b. ¡Mecachis!
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Sugar! I lost at darts again.¡Mecachis! Perdí en los dardos de nuevo.
c. ¡Chin!
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
Sugar! I banged my head getting in the car.¡Chin! Me di un trancazo en la cabeza al subir al carro.
An adjective is a word that describes a noun (e.g. the big dog).
5. (of or relating to sugar)
a. azucarero
The sugar mill in Tala produces tons of sugar.El ingenio azucarero en Tala produce toneladas de azúcar.
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