Quick answer
"Chap" is a transitive verb which is often translated as "agrietar", and "dude" is a noun which is often translated as "el tipo". Learn more about the difference between "chap" and "dude" below.
chap
A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object (e.g. I bought a book.).
1. (to cause to become chapped)
a. agrietar
This awful dry weather always chaps my lips.Este horrendo tiempo seco siempre me agrieta mucho los labios.
An intransitive verb is one that does not require a direct object (e.g. The man sneezed.).
2. (to become chapped)
a. agrietarse
Grise brought some lip balm in case her lips chapped while they were on the mountain.Grise llevó bálsamo para labios por si se le agrietaban los labios mientras estaban en la montaña.
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
3. (chapped place)
a. la grieta
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
This lipstick looks nice, but it gives me chaps on my lips.Este pintalabios se ve bien, pero me hace grietas en los labios.
4.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(guy) (United Kingdom)
a. el tipo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
There was a young chap trying to hitch a ride on the side of the road, so we decided to pick him up.Había un tipo joven que haciendo autoestop en el arcén de la carretera, así que decidimos llevarlo.
b. el tío
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Your friend was an awfully nice chap.Tu amigo era un tío muy majo.
chaps
A plural noun indicates that there is more than one person, place, thing, or idea.
plural noun
5. (clothing)
a. las chaparreras
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
A cowboy wearing chaps and a revolver on his belt walked through the doors of the saloon.Un vaquero que llevaba chaparreras y un revólver en el cinturón cruzó las puertas de la cantina.
b. los zahones
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Yolanda put on her cowboy hat, her chaps and her boots, and mounted her horse.Yolanda se puso el sombrero de vaquero, los zahones y las botas, y montó en su caballo.
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dude(
dud
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(guy)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. el tipo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
There were some dudes standing on the corner watching the girls pass by.Había unos tipos parados en la esquina mirando pasar a las chicas.
Who's that dude that's talking to your sister?¿Quién es ese tipo que está hablando con tu hermana?
b. el tío
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
He's a dude. He doesn't care about your feelings. - That's not true!Es un tío. Le dan igual tus sentimientos. - ¡Eso no es cierto!
c. el güey
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
That dude is so loud.Ese güey es bien escandaloso.
d. el huevón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Chile
(Chile)
Are you dating that dude?¿Estás pololeando con ese huevón?
e. el boludo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Argentina
(Argentina)
I can't stand that dude.No me la banco a ese boludo.
f. el maje
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Central America: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama
(Central America)
That dude owes me money.Ese maje me debe plata.
g. el mae
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Costa Rica
(Costa Rica)
That dude is really cool.Ese mae es bien tuanis.
2.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(form of address)
Regionalism used in the United States
(United States)
a. el amigo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
How's it going, dude?¿Cómo te va, amigo?
b. el mano
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Latin America: all the countries in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Does not include Spain.
(Latin America)
What's happening, dude?¿Qué es la que hay, mano?
c. el tío
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
What's up, dude?¿Qué hay, tío?
d. el güey
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Mexico
(Mexico)
What's up, dude? - Just chilling.¿Qué pex, güey? - Aquí nomás.
e. el huevón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Chile
(Chile)
Dude, who's that chick?Huevón, ¿quién es esa mina?
f. el boludo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Argentina
(Argentina)
Come on, dude!¡Ponte las pilas, boludo!
g. el mae
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Costa Rica
(Costa Rica)
What's up, dude? Doing great or doing crappy?¿Qué tal, mae? ¿Tuanis o morado?
h. el asere
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Cuba
(Cuba)
What's up, dude?¿Qué bolá, asere?
i. el cerote
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
Regionalism used in El Salvador
(El Salvador)
Regionalism used in Guatemala
(Guatemala)
Regionalism used in Honduras
(Honduras)
What's up, dude?¿Quiubo, cerote?
j. el parce
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(Andes)
What else is happening, dude?¿Y qué más, parce?
k. el maje
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Central America: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama
(Central America)
What's up, dude?¿Ideay, maje?
l. el pata
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Peru
(Peru)
What's up, dude?¿Qué tal, pata?
3.
A word or phrase that is seldom used in contemporary language and is recognized as being from another decade, (e.g. cat, groovy).
(old-fashioned)
(dandy)
a. el petimetre
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
The dude entered the hall showing off his extravagant garb.El petimetre entró en el salón luciendo su extravagante atuendo.
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