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Quick answer
"Bring on" is a transitive verb phrase which is often translated as "provocar", and "take out" is a transitive verb phrase which is often translated as "sacar". Learn more about the difference between "bring on" and "take out" below.
bring on(
brihng
 
an
)
A transitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and requires a direct object (e.g. Take out the trash.).
transitive verb phrase
1. (to cause)
a. provocar
The doctors suspected that a neurological condition had brought on the sudden change in Ralph's behavior.Los médicos creían que una condición neurológica había provocado el cambio repentino en el comportamiento de Ralph.
2. (to cause to appear)
a. hacer salir
And now, they're going to bring on the dancing bears.Y ahora van a hacer salir a los osos bailarines.
3. (to help to improve) (United Kingdom)
a. ayudar a mejorar
The older employees always do everything they can to bring on the younger ones.Los empleados mayores siempre hacen todo lo posible para ayudar a mejorar los más jóvenes.
b. potenciar el talento de
David wants to bring his new recruits on so that they can be self-sufficient as soon as possible.David quiere potenciar el talento de sus nuevas adquisiciones para que puedan ser autosuficentes lo más pronto posible.
4. (to bring to)
a. hacer que caiga sobre
The sailors believed the albatross would bring bad luck on them.Los marineros creían que el albatros haría que cayera la mala suerte sobre ellos.
b. traer
Those men have brought disgrace on their country with their actions.Esos hombres han traído desgracia a su país con sus actos.
5.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to hire)
a. sumar
We'd like to bring you on if you're still interested in the position.Nos gustaría sumarte si todavía estás interesado en el trabajo.
6.
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
(to bring; often used as a command)
a.
This refers to an idiomatic word or phrase for which there is no word-for-word translation.
no direct translation
The beer's all gone; bring on the whiskey!Se acabó la cerveza; ¡que venga el whiskey!
We're in an Indian restaurant after all; bring on the spice!Como estamos en un restaurante indio, ¡que lo hagan picante!
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take out(
teyk
 
aut
)
A transitive verb phrase is a phrase that combines a verb with a preposition or other particle and requires a direct object (e.g. Take out the trash.).
transitive verb phrase
1. (to remove)
a. sacar
Take out the trash before you go to work.Saca la basura antes de ir a trabajar.
b. extraer
The dentist took out one of my teeth because it was full of cavities.El dentista extrajo uno de mis dientes porque estaba lleno de caries.
2. (to invite out socially)
a. invitar
Can I take you out to dinner?Te puedo invitar a cenar?
b. salir con
Randy took Karla out last night.Randy salió con Karla anoche.
3. (to acquire)
a. contratar
The bank recommends that all seniors take out life insurance.El banco recomienda que toda persona de la tercera edad contrate un seguro de vida.
4.
A very informal word or phrase used by a particular group or community as a substitute for standard language (e.g. joint, john).
(slang)
(to kill)
a. matar
You have to take Tommy out; he killed a member of the Gambino crew.Tienes que matar a Tommy; asesinó a un miembro de la pandilla Gambino.
b. cargarse
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
He was taken out by some drug dealers he owed money to.Se lo cargaron unos traficantes de droga a los que debía dinero.
c. quitarse del medio
A word or phrase that is commonly used in conversational speech (e.g. skinny, grandma).
(colloquial)
It's suspected that members of his own gang took him out because he was causing a lot of problems.Se sospecha que los miembros de su propia banda se lo quitaron del medio porque les estaba causando muchos problemas.
5. (to escort outside)
a. sacar
Can you take the dogs out before the storm?¿Puedes sacar los perros antes de la tormenta?
6. (to take for later use)
a. sacar
I'm going to take out a bunch of books from the library so I can read them at the beach.Voy a sacar muchos libros de la biblioteca para poder leerlos en la playa.
7. (medicine)
a. extirpar
The surgeon took out her gallbladder.El cirujano le extirpó la vesícula.
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