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Quick answer
"Babe" is a noun which is often translated as "cariño", and "your loss" is a phrase which is often translated as "tu pérdida". Learn more about the difference between "babe" and "your loss" below.
babe(
beyb
)
A noun is a word referring to a person, animal, place, thing, feeling or idea (e.g. man, dog, house).
1. (term of endearment)
a. cariño
Babe, can you hold my hand?Cariño, ¿puedes tomar mi mano?
I don't know you, so don't call me "babe."No te conozco, así que no me digas "cariño."
2. (attractive female)
a. la mujer
(f) means that a noun is feminine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
What a babe!¡Qué mujer!
b. el bollo
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(colloquial)
Ms. Gonzalez is a total babe.Sra. Gonzalez es un bollo total.
c. el jamón
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
Hey, don't call my mom a babe!¡Oye! No le llames jamón a mi mamá.
3. (infant)
a. el bebé
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
The babe was not even born when they decided to name him Paul.Ni siquiera había nacido el bebé cuando decidieron llamarlo Paul.
b. el rorro
(m) means that a noun is masculine. Spanish nouns have a gender, which is either feminine (like la mujer or la luna) or masculine (like el hombre or el sol).
(colloquial)
Regionalism used in Spain
(Spain)
The babe is crying.El rorro está llorando.
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your loss(
yawr
 
las
)
A phrase is a group of words commonly used together (e.g once upon a time).
phrase
1. (used to talk about a death)
a. tu pérdida
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
My condolences on your loss. Please let me know how I can help you.Mis condolencias por tu pérdida. Por favor, dime cómo puedo ayudarte.
b. su pérdida
A word or phrase used to refer to the second person formal “usted” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. usted).
(formal)
(singular)
I'm so sorry about your loss. Your father was such a great man.Lamento mucho su pérdida. Su padre era un gran hombre.
2. (used to talk about a defeat)
a. tu derrota
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Don't worry about your loss last week. Just focus on your practice.No te preocupes por tu derrota la semana pasada. Concéntrate en su práctica.
b. su derrota
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
Your loss will not take you out of the tournament.Su derrota no la sacará del torneo.
3. (used when someone declines an activity or opportunity)
a. tú te lo pierdes
A word of phrase used to refer to the second person informal “tú” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. How are you?).
(informal)
(singular)
I don't want you to cut my hair. I'd rather go to the salon. - Your loss! I'm pretty good at it.No quiero que me recortes. Prefiero ir al salón de belleza. - Tú te lo pierdes. Soy muy buena en eso.
b. used se lo pierde
A word or phrase used to refer to the second person formal “usted” by their conjugation or implied context (e.g. usted).
(formal)
(singular)
I won't be able to be at the presentation today. - Your loss! But seriously, you'll have to get the information from Margo.No puedo asistir a la presentación hoy. - ¡Usted se lo pierde! Pero en serio, deberá obtener la información de Margo.
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