¿El Bautismo o El Bautizo?

0
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confused Can anyone tell me, if there is a difference between bautizo & bautismo...? If there is, would anyone care to explain? Pretty Please!? ...Yo realmente podría usar algo de ayuda. downer

29101 views
updated OCT 3, 2012
posted by Aisha-E-Norman

19 Answers

1
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Bautizo es the yo form of bautizar which means to baptize, so bautizo means I baptize.

Bautismo means baptism.

Actually, "bautizo" is also the same as "bautizo". As a matter of fact, in Spain we use more the word "bautizo" for particular celebrations (this word is used more), and "bautismo" more for theological discussions, but as far as I know, they are interchangeable.

Yo realmente podría usar algo de ayuda. downer

That sentence is grammatically correct, but it sounds awfully foreign; no native talks like that... unless he or she has been educated under a very strong American influence, and far from other natives. First of all, and as a general rule, NEVER use "yo"; never. A more natural alternative for this could be:

Me vendría bien un poco de ayuda.
No me vendría mal un poco de ayuda.

Oh... Thank you so very much, 'Sr. Member'. I have another favor to ask; Are there any differences in a hispanic christening, as opposed to a regular english-based one? I've come to believe that most of hispanic society follows catholicism, so... is there any special custom that is specifically tied to a hispanic christening? blank stare

It depends on the country and the church you chose for the Christening. In Spain, we went to a Catholic church, and the priest used some oil and poured some water over my daughter's head, along with the usual sermons.

updated OCT 3, 2012
posted by lazarus1907
1
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Hi Aisha!

Bautismo = sacrament
Bautizo = action of baptism, also the meeting to celebrate the baptism.

Howerver, in Mexico "bautizo" is used as a synonim of "bautismo".

In Catholicism humans have to be baptized when are babies and only their foreheads are wet. In Protestantism humans are batized when they become an adult and the whole body is immersed.

updated OCT 3, 2012
posted by AntMexico
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Depende de que religion se este hablando. Bautizo,es para borrar el perdon del pacado original (Catolisismo mas que nada)

Bautismo es cuando la llega a una edad suficiente de entender la diferencia entre el bien y el mal. Algunos dicen 7 años. La persona es sumergida completamente en un cuerpo de agua ( Cristianismo)

updated OCT 3, 2012
posted by justpassingbye
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Estaba intentando ver diferentes ejemplos.

Es verdad, que yo puedo decir: el lunes vamos a celebrar el bautizo de mi hijo. (Ceremonia).

El sacerdote, sin embargo, diría: el lunes vamos a celebrar el sacramento del bautismo en la iglesia. También es una celebración, pero utilizo delante la palabra "sacramento".

Esta forma de expresarse la suele utilizar mejor un sacerdote porque es mucho más formal y además dentro de un contexto.

Además "bautizo" sí se puede utilizar para referirse a un acontecimiento religioso o social o como lugar donde se celebra ese acontecimiento religioso o social. Sí puedo decir "estoy en un bautizo", pero no puedo decir "estoy en un bautismo".

updated JUN 24, 2009
posted by nila45
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La teoría es esa nila o toni, pero la realidad es otra, incluso la RAE los da como sinónimos:

bautismo.

(De baptismo).

  1. m. Primero de los sacramentos del cristianismo, con el cual se da el ser de gracia y el carácter cristiano.

  2. m. En diversas religiones, rito de purificación.

  3. m. bautizo.

sin embargo no se diría por aquí al menos:

Tengo un bautismo, si esto va en referencia a una fiesta.

Cierto Heidita. Acá pasa lo mismo pero con "bautizo".

updated JUN 24, 2009
posted by AntMexico
0
votes

Bautismo = sacrament

Bautizo = action of baptism, also the meeting to celebrate the baptism.

Howerver, in Mexico "bautizo" is used as a synonim of "bautismo".

This is the pattern that I am accustomed to hearing.

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
0
votes

La teoría es esa nila o toni, pero la realidad es otra, incluso la RAE los da como sinónimos:

bautismo.

(De baptismo).

  1. m. Primero de los sacramentos del cristianismo, con el cual se da el ser de gracia y el carácter cristiano.

  2. m. En diversas religiones, rito de purificación.

  3. m. bautizo.

sin embargo no se diría por aquí al menos:

Tengo un bautismo, si esto va en referencia a una fiesta.

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by 00494d19
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Estoy totalmente de acuerdo contigo Nila. Has dado un perfecto ejemplo.

El bautismo es un sacramento. El bautizo es la ceremonia donde se celebra ese sacramento.

Un sacerdote puede decir en un bautizo: estamos aquí para celebrar el sacramento del bautismo.

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by AntMexico
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If you require a special emphasis, you can use them, but how often in a conversation do you require this unusual emphasis which normally goes along with a higher pitch and volume anyway? "Clarification" is often misunderstood by most people, because they'll say: "ÿl vino ayer a verme", because you need to know whether it is a he or a she, but this is not true most of the time:

Personal pronouns in Spanish are used more when we want to stablish contrasts: "I don't know about you, but "I" don't like it". Here the contrast is between "you" and "I", and omitting either personal pronoun in Spanish would sound very strange indeed.

Even if you don't understand when to [del]you [/del]use them, and when not to use them, the safest bet is not to use them, as it is the most likely scenario.

Whew! OK. You had me scared for a minute, Lazarus. I was worried that maybe I had been sticking my foot in my mouth every day for the last several years. Thanks for clarifying that. That is the general concept I had of subjective case personal pronouns, but it is always good to have issues of usage laid out so plainly, and illustrated so clearly.

I think I got it now, entonces yo me despido, right''

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco
0
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El bautismo es un sacramento. El bautizo es la ceremonia donde se celebra ese sacramento.

Un sacerdote puede decir en un bautizo: estamos aquí para celebrar el sacramento del bautismo.

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by nila45
0
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My first reaction to this was, "If you NEVER use the word yo, then why is it even a word/in the dictionary'" But I know that "NEVER" never means absolutely never (see ...')

Here I go, learning something again on this forum ...

Please explain, Lazarus. I know that certain or excessive usage of the first person singular of the subjective case personal pronoun can come across as, well, how would you say ... creído, presumido ...? But what is the rule, or at least the standard of modesty and politeness regarding "yo"? I use it, and I hear native speakers use it often, for clarification or emphasis. Please help me/us with this, Lazarus--you have to knock off our rough edges and polish us "up," to tie in another thread.

Ok, I exaggerated a bit, but anyway, would you advice a learner of English to say the "F" word? I guess not, and yet, it is in the dictionary. There are certain words that require certain level of proficiency before you can use them in the proper context, and personal pronouns are this kind of words, although not for the same reasons as the "F" word. At some point in your life, you'll probably have to shout, maybe because you are angry, maybe because it's too noisy and you cannot be heard, but in any case, you don't go shouting all the time; only when you have to. Personal pronouns in Spanish have some specific functions, and when they are needed, we used them, but that doesn't mean that you go using personal pronouns all the time. Quite often, the effect is quite tedious: if you say "Yo fui a la calle y yo visité a unos amigos y yo estaba contento", it sounds like "I, yes that's me, went to the street and I, yes that's me, visited some friends, and I, yes that's me, was happy". One can't help thinking "why is he saying "YO" so many times without any apparent reason'" Does he have any obsession with himself?

If you require a special emphasis, you can use them, but how often in a conversation do you require this unusual emphasis which normally goes along with a higher pitch and volume anyway? "Clarification" is often misunderstood by most people, because they'll say: "ÿl vino ayer a verme", because you need to know whether it is a he or a she, but this is not true most of the time:

¿Te acuerdas de Juan? Vino a verme el otro día.

There is absolutely no need to clarify here, because context provides all the clarification needed. Actually, it is personal pronouns without context that need clarification. Imagine that you meet a friend in the street, and after saying "Hello", he says: "´He came to visit me yesterday". He? Who on Earth is "he"? Normally, you need to mention someone before using pronouns (or there are certain circumstances that provide this information). In Spanish we differentiate between "you" singular and "you" plural, but in English, context is enough most of the time.

Personal pronouns in Spanish are more used when we want to stablish contrasts: "I don't know about you, but "I" don't like it". Here the contrast is between "you" and "I", and omitting either personal pronoun in Spanish would sound very strange indeed.

Even if you don't understand when to you use them, and when not to use them, the safest be is not to use them, as it is the most likely scenario.

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

ohh gulp question ¡Lo siento...! pero, I'm just trying to keep up with you all. lol. My Tutor is from Cuba, so at least... I have a living example of a Native tongue; & background to work with. But, I guess that it all depends on if she would cooperate... hasta cierto punto. tongue wink

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by Aisha-E-Norman
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I couldn't say "me voy a encuentro..." or "El decretar nos dice...". That is what I meant by them not being interchangeable.

Yes, they are not interchangeable, but you can say:

Voy a un bautizo
Voy a un encuentro
Voy a una protesta
El decreto N.º 50 dice que....

since they are all names here, not verbs.

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Toni put it much better than me. Mexican usage is identical to the one in Spain.

Nathaniel, there are countless nouns in Spanish derived from the verb:

bautizar: bautizo

encontrar: encuentro

decretar: decreto

protestar: protesta

avisar: aviso

Yes, but, the nouns and verbs are not interchangeable.

I couldn't say "me voy a encuentro..." or "El decretar nos dice...". That is what I meant by them not being interchangeable.

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by Nathaniel
0
votes

That sentence is grammatically correct, but it sounds awfully foreign; no native talks like that... unless he or she has been educated under a very strong American influence, and far from other natives. First of all, and as a general rule, NEVER use "yo"; never. A more natural alternative for this could be:

Me vendría bien un poco de ayuda.

No me vendría mal un poco de ayuda.

My first reaction to this was, "If you NEVER use the word yo, then why is it even a word/in the dictionary'" But I know that "NEVER" never means absolutely never (see ...')

Here I go, learning something again on this forum ...

Please explain, Lazarus. I know that certain or excessive usage of the first person singular of the subjective case personal pronoun can come across as, well, how would you say ... creído, presumido ...? But what is the rule, or at least the standard of modesty and politeness regarding "yo"? I use it, and I hear native speakers use it often, for clarification or emphasis. Please help me/us with this, Lazarus--you have to knock off our rough edges and polish us "up," to tie in another thread.

Thanks

updated JUN 23, 2009
posted by hhmdirocco