How to use

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How to use personal pronouns like: son,ellos ..exampels:
Their house is very big.
These cars are for my parents.
Their salute in their country is "hola".
My car is beautiful than their.
those kids are their sons.
leave them tell i come back to take.

thank you

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updated FEB 28, 2009
posted by abdelhadi yousef shnaikat

10 Answers

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Toni replied it well..I have also learnt them...grasias toni..brotherwink

updated FEB 28, 2009
posted by Hamdi-Paragz
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Abdelhadi, I hope that you are still following this thread. I hope that this is true for two reasons: 1) If you have read the responses of MJ, it should be obvious that there are people here, who are willing to work hard to help you with your questions (even if they are not sure what you are asking). 2) Not a comment on your question (but, rather, on MJ's response), as a reply to someone who has expressed a lack of comfort with English, you are using a substantial number of 'colloquial' phrases that may prove difficult/unintelligible for a non-native speaker. In cases such as this, I would suggest that you use more-than-normal 'formal' English because it is less likely to misinterpretation.

updated FEB 27, 2009
posted by samdie
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hey abdel you can use pronouns like that in spanish :

plural : them /their / these/ those :ellos, ellas, esas, esos
like this :
Tell them i will be back < Diles a ellos que volvere ( accent in the e )( them = ellos )

Their house is very big < su casa es muy grande ( their = su )

These cars are for my parents < esos autos son para mis padres ( these = esos )

Their salute in their country is hola < el saludo de ellos en su pais es hola (their = ellos in this case )

My car is more beautiful than their car < Mi carro es mas bonito que el de ellos ( their = ellos )

Those kids are their sons < Esos ninos son sus hijos ( those = ESOS , their = SUS )

late but i hope it helps ..

updated FEB 27, 2009
posted by ninozka
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Note to Abdelhadi: There is a convention in written Spanish, of attaching the personal pronouns to the preceding words wherever possible, depending on sentence construction.

As with déjelos and tomarlos, in the sentence, Déjelos hasta que regreso a tomarlos, which translates to, Leave them until I return to take them.

This convention does not make these pronouns parts of the preceding words, except in appearance.

I mention this because in one of my answers to you I wrote, "Spanish classifies words as pronouns only when those words can stand alone in that function."

In the above sentence the pronoun, los, meaning them, remains an independently functioning word in its own right, both times it appears.

updated FEB 27, 2009
posted by MJ
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Well the original sentence was, "leave them tell i come back to take."

Which I interpreted to mean, *"Leave them until I come back to take them."
*
And ¡#@xx+'%@! I am tearing my hair out here!

Steps 3 - 7 of my article above got cut off and no way to get them back. That's how new I am to this foro, I didn't realize the word limits for an individual post.

Well I don't have the stamina to go back through every step again, but Abdel (and everyone else), you probably get the idea.

Even with a limited knowledge of Spanish, you can translate almost anything if you are willing to back and forth on the machine translators, using the dictionary where you must, as well as the verb conjugation charts. Think of it like doing some puzzle and it will feel more amusing.

What I ended up with, using my version of Abdelhadi's sentence, "Leave them until I come back to take them, " and plugging that into the machine translators is this, on both Google and Free Translation:
*
Déjelos hasta que regrese a tomarlos.*

On Google, this reverse translated back into: Leave them until they return to take them. I was happy with the machine substituting the verb return for come back.

Substituting the 1st person singular present tense of the verb, regresar, to return, regreso, gives me an exact translation of the sentence I want:

Leave them until I return to take them. Déjelos hasta que regreso a tomarlos.

There is an old saying, "Nothing comes easy, and nothing looks hard after you know it."

Or if there never was a saying like that then there should've been.

updated FEB 27, 2009
posted by MJ
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Abdelhadi wrote: [I need help h]ow to use [Spanish] personal pronouns like: ... leave them tell i come back to take.
thank you.

Abdel, I am guessing you meant, "Leave them until I come back to take them." If this is not correct, please say so, and -- if at this point you can muster the courage to expose a todo el mundo your novice attempts at writing the Spanish language--please also add how you think your sentence/s might translate into español.

I know writing in Spanish feels risky. And ordinarily I do not presume to try and read the future. But, con permiso, if I may chance a forecast on this particular matter, I predict: If you can get yourself to write in Spanish just once en este foro, you will look back on your current fears with laughter.

Now, permit me to describe how I, with my limited Spanish, am going to go about translating your sentence as best I can. Let me add, too, that this is Not the only way to do it; in fact, it is a very inefficient way, especially if, like yours truly, you lean toward shooting for perfection in using language. (Some even have said I can be a bit obsessive-compulsive about it ....)

With that disclaimer, here is the easiest way I know how to do it, at this point in time. ¡Vámonos! We are going on a journey.

Step 1: First, I call on a few machine translators, three to be exact. I know they most likely will give me lots of errors, but they will give some hints, too. I bring them all up at once with the blue Translation link at page top. http://www.spanishdict.com/translation

Okay, I've got the page titled, Spanish English Translation.

Just for funzies I start by entering the sentence as you wrote it, errors and all, into the top box, then click on the green button below it reading, Translate Text. I am hoping against hope that at least one machine translator will give me at least one Spanish sentence that can be machine-translated back into English resembling your original sentence, but making its meaning clearer to me.

Almost instantly I get results:

Original sentence: leave them tell i come back to take. (sic)
Machine translations, top down:

Google:
1) deje decirle i volver a tomar.

Free Translation:
2) Déjeles dicen regreso a tomar.

Yahoo Babel Fish:
3) déjelos me dicen vuelven tomar.

I am not even going to try and translate this convoluted Spanish on my own; I am clueless.

Step 2: I bring up a new Translation page, cut-n-paste all 3 translations into it, switch the radio button to: Spanish to English, then click. (Had I used the old translation page and just switch radio buttons, only the top translator would have given me results, and I want all I can get. Note: I'm sure this is a program bug that someday will be fixed.)

Here are my new results from the 3 machine translators. (I am adding the Spanish for easy reference):

Google:
1) deje decirle i volver a tomar. let say i retake.
2) Déjeles dicen regreso a tomar. Let them say to take back.
3) déjelos ones say to me return to take. let me say again taken.

Free Translation:
1) deje decirle i volver a tomar. it leave to tell him i to take again.
2) Déjeles dicen regreso a tomar. Leave them they say return to take.
3) déjelos ones say to me return to take. leave them they tell they return me to take.

Yahoo Babel Fish:
1) deje decirle i volver a tomar. it lets say i to him to return to take.
2) Déjeles dicen regreso a tomar. Déjeles says return to take.
3) déjelos ones say to me return to take. déjelos ones say to me return to take.

!Por Dios¡ I should've given myself more credit to begin with! I am smarter than the machine translators, even if they do know more words! And, after all, I was born into the English language. Let me look again at that original sentence:

updated FEB 27, 2009
posted by MJ
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MJ wrote: It can take some time to become familiar with our Spanishdict.com website because it is So multifaceted....

Let me clarify that by our I mean the, but for our community use, LOL. Looking at how we all talk about Spanishdict.com sometimes I begin to see how someone new might think spanishdict has hired a bunch of teachers for the forum!

Not so; we forers are just here lending each other a helping hand smile

updated FEB 27, 2009
posted by MJ
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Abdelhadi wrote: [I need help h]ow to use personal pronouns like: son,ellos ..examples: ... thank you

Abdel, I'm guessing that by now you know the verb ser, one of the two verbs en español, meaning to be, is irregular in its conjugation. Let's look at that conjugation, please, in the spanishdict conjugator, (blue Conjugation link at page top).
http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/ser

Son, (they are), is 3rd person plural, present tense.

They is a pronoun of course. But Spanish classifies words as pronouns only when those words can stand alone in that function. Like your example of the subject pronoun, ellos.

In most beginning Spanish textbooks there are misleading examples of sentences constructed like this: subject pronoun, verb, object. Sentences like, e.g., "Ellos son estudiantes." They are students.

But this is wrong. Well, not exactly wrong, but without a special reason to talk like that, the sentence would sound weird to a native Spanish speaker.

Why?

Because the sentence has a redundant subject pronoun they would use only to add special emphasis. For instance, to distinguish one group of people from another at a fiesta someone might say: Ellos son estudiantes, pero ellos no. They are students, but they are not.

One place to find examples of sentences in Spanish and English, and often Spanish idioms, too, is in spanishdict's Dictionary, (blue Dictionary link at page top, far right). The entry for ser probably tells you more than you want to know right now. But under subheading 6, is the answer to your question about using, son.

This is their example sentence under that subheading, and it is complete: *Son estudiantes.
* http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/ser

It can take some time to become familiar with our Spanishdict.com website because it is So multifaceted. As you get to know it, though, you will come to appreciate that it has given us some good resources at our fingertips. ~mj

PS Now, in a separate answer, let me take a stab at translating your last sentence wink

updated FEB 27, 2009
posted by MJ
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Their house is very big.
Su casa es muy grande

These cars are for my parents.
Estos carros son de mis padres

Their salute in their country is "hola".
Su saludo en su país es "hola".

My car is beautiful than their.
Mi carro es más bonito que el de ellos.

those kids are their sons.
Aquellos niños son sus hijos.

leave them tell i come back to take.
(')

updated FEB 26, 2009
posted by AntMexico
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Abdelhadi, Quentin told you already that "son" is not a pronoun. Why don't you check the reference section of this site for more detailed information? Your sentences contain a mix of several types of pronouns, and any answer will be too long to cover all of them.

updated FEB 25, 2009
posted by lazarus1907