"I hope you like this forum"

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Hola a todos.

When I was writing something, I was not able to figure out how to write "I hope you like this forum" in Spanish.

What I wrote was - "Espero te gustélo el foro".

However, I feel like there is something missing and does not look or sound correctly either.

Por favor alguien puede ayudarme.

Gracias de antemano,

Marco

4574 views
updated ENE 6, 2009
posted by Marco-T

16 Answers

0
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lazarus1907 said:

Marco T said:

I got confused here. Why was "se" used in the first and second sentence, but not in the third sentence? Is the first sentence translated to "I forgot the question"?

Is the second sentence translated to "I have dropped my wallet"? (It does not sound or look correctly for me)

My translation for the third sentence is "my leg is hurt", but would like to hear the translation from natives.

My guessing is that the translation would be "it hurts me the leg" for the third sentence if "se" was used. But really confused here and wonder when "se" should be used and when not.

The first two "SE" modify the verbs two slightly, turning them into accidents, or things that suddenly got out of control. For example, "caer" is to fall under the effect of gravity - a good verb to talk about physics. "Caerse" is used when things suddenly fall, drop or fall because people drop them; all accidents. "Olvidar" normally is fine, but using the alternative "SE" construction, it sounds more like an unfortunate incident that happened to you than you being responsible for having forgotten it. The nuance is quite difficult to translate. The last one doesn't accept this kind of "SE", like most verbs. You have to memorize these things, I'm afraid, but these constructions are particularly useful and common.

Your explanation is very clear and helpful.
It is really useful for me because I translated "se" to "it" most time before. Now I know that "se" construction makes the sentences sound like something happens suddenly or unexpectative.

Thank you, lazarus.

Marco

updated ENE 6, 2009
posted by Marco-T
0
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lazarus1907 said:

Yes, I've wonder about that myself many times. Maybe we should throw this question at the next person who asks" why is gustar so weird or difficult to use'". Does it disgust you, or "gust" you? No, it is rather gusting. Jejeje.
If past experience is any guide, it should not be more that a day or two before the question is repeated.

updated ENE 6, 2009
posted by samdie
0
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samdie said:

I find it interesting that the English construction most closely related (etymologically) to "gustar" (in Spanish) is the negative formulation. We say "II disgusts me." Obviously, there exist other constructions (basically passive) that, again, make "me" the grammatical subject (i.e. I find it disgusting" or "I am disgusted by it.") Why, then, when we shift from displeasing to pleasing, do English speakers have so much trouble with this construction?

Yes, I've wonder about that myself many times. Maybe we should throw this question at the next person who asks" why is gustar so weird or difficult to use'". Does it disgust you, or "gust" you? No, it is rather gusting. Jejeje.

updated ENE 6, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
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Marco T said:

I got confused here. Why was "se" used in the first and second sentence, but not in the third sentence?

Is the first sentence translated to "I forgot the question"?

Is the second sentence translated to "I have dropped my wallet"? (It does not sound or look correctly for me)

My translation for the third sentence is "my leg is hurt", but would like to hear the translation from natives.

My guessing is that the translation would be "it hurts me the leg" for the third sentence if "se" was used. But really confused here and wonder when "se" should be used and when not.

The first two "SE" modify the verbs two slightly, turning them into accidents, or things that suddenly got out of control. For example, "caer" is to fall under the effect of gravity - a good verb to talk about physics. "Caerse" is used when things suddenly fall, drop or fall because people drop them; all accidents. "Olvidar" normally is fine, but using the alternative "SE" construction, it sounds more like an unfortunate incident that happened to you than you being responsible for having forgotten it. The nuance is quite difficult to translate. The last one doesn't accept this kind of "SE", like most verbs. You have to memorize these things, I'm afraid, but these constructions are particularly useful and common.

updated ENE 6, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

The grammatical answer is that intransitive verbs are those without direct object (and hence, no "lo"). Verbs with an "inverted construction" (not the technical name) in Spanish are typically intransitive: Me gusta el arroz. (I like rice)

To me, rice is pleasing
I find it interesting that the English construction most closely related (etymologically) to "gustar" (in Spanish) is the negative formulation. We say "II disgusts me." Obviously, there exist other constructions (basically passive) that, again, make "me" the grammatical subject (i.e. I find it disgusting" or "I am disgusted by it.") Why, then, when we shift from displeasing to pleasing, do English speakers have so much trouble with this construction'

updated ENE 6, 2009
posted by samdie
0
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updated ENE 6, 2009
posted by Marco-T
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samdie said:

We're talking at cross purposes here.

No, we are not. I simply didn't read what you wrote, sorry.

You can omit the indirect objects, but "espero que guste" is used when you want to purposefully omit any reference to anyone in particular, like in an impersonal or passive sentence. "Guste a a todos" is not so bad, because of that "a todos", but it sounds almost "over-ceremonious" (I can't put it in words right now).

updated ENE 6, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

samdie said:

lazarus1907 said:

"Espero que este foro sea útil y que guste a todos"

No dative(s) of benefit?

How many natives have you found who'd find that acceptable? Not advisable for beginners anyway, since they are going to be systematically correct if they try to use indicative here.


We're talking at cross purposes here. I expect the subjunctive here. However, I also expected an indirect object pronoun (or two) and that was the thrust of my question.

updated ENE 6, 2009
posted by samdie
0
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samdie said:

lazarus1907 said:

"Espero que este foro sea útil y que guste a todos"

No dative(s) of benefit?

How many natives have you found who'd find that acceptable? Not advisable for beginners anyway, since they are going to be systematically correct if they try to use indicative here.

El empleo del indicativo [con el verbo esperar] es posible cuando el proceso referido en la oración subordinada se localiza en futuro, pero no cn otro tiempo.
Gramática descriptiva de la RAE.

Los verbos temer y esperar presentan además la alternancia indicativo/subjuntivo, aunque solo con referencia al futuro.
El subjuntivo - Fernández Álvarez.

Tanto si la proposición principal es afirmativa como si es negativa, determinan el uso de subjuntivo en la proposición nominal complemento los siguientes tipos de verbo:
a) Verbos volitivos, [...] esperar.

El subjuntivo castellano - Navas Ruiz

Por eso, utilizamos siempre el subjuntivo (o el infinifivo) con los verbos subordinados que expresan deseos u objetivos: [...] esperar.
Gramática básica del estudiante español.

Esperar 'to hope' may be followed by the subjunctive, by the future indicative, by the indicative of ir a, or by the conditional. The subjunctive is by far the commoner form when the verb means 'to hope'. Use of the indicative of these tenses suggests the meaning 'to expect':
A New Reference Grammar of Modern Spanish

updated ENE 6, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

"Espero que este foro sea útil y que guste a todos"
No dative(s) of benefit'

updated ENE 6, 2009
posted by samdie
0
votes

Marco T said:

Sometimes the "lo" is needed and would you please tell me what kind of sentences that need "lo" which refers to something that is redundant? Would you please give me some examples? I do remember that you posted the explanation of this question before, but I need some examples in order to figure them out by myself, otherwise would not be able to remember them.

The grammatical answer is that intransitive verbs are those without direct object (and hence, no "lo"). Verbs with an "inverted construction" (not the technical name) in Spanish are typically intransitive:

Me gusta el arroz. (I like rice)
To me, rice is pleasing

You wouldn't say "To me, rice is pleasing IT, right? Neither would you in Spanish. More verb like this:

Se me olvidó la pregunta.
Se me ha caído la cartera.
Me duele la pierna.

In all the sentences above, the subject is actually the last word (or words), but English speakers feel that the subject is "I", and therefore they want to say "I feel/do/drop/like... IT", while the sentence is actually "To me / in me, something has some sort of effect", with this "something" at the end of the sentence as a subject. Many of these sentences being with a "me / te / le /se..." (but not necessarily, of course).

updated ENE 6, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Kona le su = in other words..AMBER lol said:

Espero que como todos los de este foro("I hope you all like this forum")or "Espero que este foro sea útil y que guste a todos" (I hope this forum is useful and you all like it)

>

updated ENE 6, 2009
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Kona le su = in other words..AMBER lol said:

Espero que como todos los de este foro("I hope you all like this forum")or "Espero que este foro es útil y que gusta a todos" (I hope this forum is useful and you all like it) and there are many more,there are many other ways you can say it English or Spanish


"como" means "like" as "A is like B." (i.e. is similar to") not as in "A likes B." (or "A and B like C.")

Espero que este foro les resulte útil y que les guste a todos. (ustedes)

updated ENE 6, 2009
posted by samdie
0
votes

lazarus1907 said:

Espero que te guste lo el foro

Of course, I am assuming that "you" refers to one person, and not to several (otherwise it would be "os"). I need to mention this next time some English speaker asks me how do you know who is the subject if you omit the subject pronoun in Spanish: how do you know if it is a singular or a plural "you"?

That "que" is found omitted a few times with certain verbs when speakers try to sound sophisticated, but it is not frequent, and grammars recommend not to, in any case. "Gustar" is intransitive, so it doesn't admit "lo":

"I hope that to you is pleasing the forum"

Gracias, mi maestro.

Tu respuesta es muy útil siempre.

I am still confused about this, not this sentence.
Sometimes the "lo" is needed and would you please tell me what kind of sentences that need "lo" which refers to something that is redundant?

Would you please give me some examples? I do remember that you posted the explanation of this question before, but I need some examples in order to figure them out by myself, otherwise would not be able to remember them.

Thank you,

Marco

updated ENE 6, 2009
posted by Marco-T
0
votes

Actually, its pronounced
Espero que os guste este foro
You can say it in many ways like

Espero que como todos los de este foro("I hope you all like this forum")or "Espero que este foro es útil y que gusta a todos" (I hope this forum is useful and you all like it) and there are many more,there are many other ways you can say it English or Spanish

lazarus1907 said:

Espero que te guste lo el foroOf course, I am assuming that "you" refers to one person, and not to several (otherwise it would be "os"). I need to mention this next time some English speaker asks me how do you know who is the subject if you omit the subject pronoun in Spanish: how do you know if it is a singular or a plural "you"'That "que" is found omitted a few times with certain verbs when speakers try to sound sophisticated, but it is not frequent, and grammars recommend not to, in any case. "Gustar" is intransitive, so it doesn't admit "lo":"I hope that to you is pleasing the forum"

>

updated ENE 6, 2009
posted by ----Amber----