seamlessly?

0
votes

Hi!
Would you mind giving me a modulate translation for this word? Is it "perfectamente"?
Thank you!

4275 views
updated NOV 19, 2008
posted by Monica-Flores

21 Answers

1
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We definitely need context to give the best translation, but two options are:

a la perfección
suavemente

updated ABR 15, 2015
posted by 00bacfba
1
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While "seamless" literally means without a seam, sin costura, "seamlessly" is usually used in a slightly different sense. It refers to something that goes off without a hitch, or to two things that fit together without a problem (in a metaphorical sense).

The details were planned so well that the two companies merged seamlessly.
The new software fit into our old system seamlessly. (yeah right)

updated ABR 15, 2015
posted by Natasha
0
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Eddy said:

:

Damn, I really thought you would "bite" regarding the American spelling, he he. Listen, I bow to your superior grammatical knowledge, however, that doesn't prevent me from arguing, albeit from a lower grammatical viewpoint.

Somehow I really doubt that anyone on this site would like to actually defend the English orthography, British or American.

updated NOV 19, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
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James Santiago said:

This site says seemless is an archaic adjective, so I assume seemlessly would be the adverb. "Seemless" Also I have 191,000 googits with the spelling of seemless, so there are a lot of people making mistakes. I mean, over here in England we think color, flavor and favorite are spelling mistakes made by Americans. You are misunderstanding me. I'm not saying that seemless isn't a real word (it is, although it is very rarely used today). I'm saying that in the sentence given at the site you referenced, "laptop needs to seemlessly access home and office...how'," the word seemless (which is a synonym of unseemly) makes no sense at all, and it is clearly a mistake for seamlessly, meaning "the laptop needs to be able to access home and office smoothly and without any noticeable interruption." If someone wrote "I popped a seem in my shirt," I would hope that you wouldn't argue that that is merely popular usage and not a mistake. The same applies to the website quote in question.

Damn, I really thought you would "bite" regarding the American spelling, he he. Listen, I bow to your superior grammatical knowledge, however, that doesn't prevent me from arguing, albeit from a lower grammatical viewpoint.

updated NOV 19, 2008
posted by Eddy
0
votes

This site says seemless is an archaic adjective, so I assume seemlessly would be the adverb. "Seemless" Also I have 191,000 googits with the spelling of seemless, so there are a lot of people making mistakes. I mean, over here in England we think color, flavor and favorite are spelling mistakes made by Americans.

You are misunderstanding me. I'm not saying that seemless isn't a real word (it is, although it is very rarely used today). I'm saying that in the sentence given at the site you referenced, "laptop needs to seemlessly access home and office...how'," the word seemless (which is a synonym of unseemly) makes no sense at all, and it is clearly a mistake for seamlessly, meaning "the laptop needs to be able to access home and office smoothly and without any noticeable interruption." If someone wrote "I popped a seem in my shirt," I would hope that you wouldn't argue that that is merely popular usage and not a mistake. The same applies to the website quote in question.

updated NOV 19, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

James Santiago said:

Eddy said:

samdie said:

"seemlessly" is not even a word while "seamlessly" is (normally used to refer to a repair/conjoining that is done so well as to be [almost] invisible). Therefor, I would suggest "invisible".

I thought language evolved through common usage. They appear to be using it on this site albeit in the place of seamlessly.

seemlessly

Eddy, there is common usage, and there are outright mistakes. The usage at the site you linked to is a mistake, pure and simple.

This site says seemless is an archaic adjective, so I assume seemlessly would be the adverb. "Seemless" Also I have 191,000 googits with the spelling of seemless, so there are a lot of people making mistakes. I mean, over here in England we think color, flavor and favorite are spelling mistakes made by Americans.

updated NOV 19, 2008
posted by Eddy
0
votes

Thanks James!
Actually I don't need to translate it. I'm working on a project on vocab. development. I wanted to make sure that I got the right meaning. That's a weird word lol Thanks for helping. I might be asking more questions later.

James Santiago said:

In that case, suavemente is probably a close fit.

Otra cosa de que me di cuenta era que mis colegas parecían entrar en y salir de la conversación muy suavemente, mientras a mí me costó mucho decidir qué debía decir para informarles que quería hablar.

The above is just a quick translation off the top of my head, but I hope it gives you the idea.

>

updated NOV 18, 2008
posted by Monica-Flores
0
votes

In that case, suavemente is probably a close fit.

Otra cosa de que me di cuenta era que mis colegas parecían entrar en y salir de la conversación muy suavemente, mientras a mí me costó mucho decidir qué debía decir para informarles que quería hablar.

The above is just a quick translation off the top of my head, but I hope it gives you the idea.

updated NOV 18, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Hi everybody!
Thanks for all your ideas. I'll give more context, but I think I got it. I spelled it as it appears in an article I was reading. There you go:
"Another thing I noticed was that my colleagues seemed to go in and out of the discussion SEAMLESSLY while I struggled with what I should say to let them know that I wanted to speak."
Have a wonderful evening all of you!

updated NOV 18, 2008
posted by Monica-Flores
0
votes

Please hurry and make a mistake, so that we can pounce on you.
As we say up nNorth,jo,jo,jo

James Santiago said:

We definitely need context to give the best translation, but two options are:a la perfecciónsuavemente

>

updated NOV 18, 2008
posted by 00769608
0
votes

Eddy said:

samdie said:

"seemlessly" is not even a word while "seamlessly" is (normally used to refer to a repair/conjoining that is done so well as to be [almost] invisible). Therefor, I would suggest "invisible".

I thought language evolved through common usage. They appear to be using it on this site albeit in the place of seamlessly.

seemlessly

Eddy, there is common usage, and there are outright mistakes. The usage at the site you linked to is a mistake, pure and simple.

updated NOV 18, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

There are a ton of suggestions on wordreference, folks. We have to have context to even make sense here.

updated NOV 18, 2008
posted by Natasha
0
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samdie said:

"seemlessly" is not even a word while "seamlessly" is (normally used to refer to a repair/conjoining that is done so well as to be [almost] invisible). Therefor, I would suggest "invisible".

I thought language evolved through common usage. They appear to be using it on this site albeit in the place of seamlessly.
seemlessly

updated NOV 18, 2008
posted by Eddy
0
votes

seam -two pieces of cloth sewn together
seamlessly I think is not correct,
seemly-- decently
We really need more data. But, is fun guessing.

updated NOV 18, 2008
posted by 00769608
0
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If indeed monica has spelt the word correctly, then as Natasha has intimated with reagrds software "prefectamente" would fit the meaning.

updated NOV 18, 2008
posted by Eddy