que, lo, le, and ya

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They have soooo many meanings and uses.. I really don't know where to begin. Can someone help me'

4154 views
updated NOV 25, 2008
posted by LB

17 Answers

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My question is if "se" can be used to refer both person and things or it only can be used to refer person. Don't get confused; se is also a "reflexive" pronoun. I was only talking about the case where se replaces le or les because it comes before lo, etc. I believe the indirect object pronoun could refer to things as well as people, but I'm not coming up with an example off the top of my head.

Then in this kind of sentence, do we always put "se" which refers to person at the first position, then "lo" or "la" which refers to things follows' Yes, the order is fixed.

Does this mean a transitive verb also can take an indirect object depending on the situations' Of course it could. Le leía el libro a su niño. He was reading the book to his child. The child (le, a su niño) is the indirect object. The book (libro) is the direct object.

updated NOV 25, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Natasha said:

Does "se" refer to "him"' Yes.Do transitive verbs require direct objects and intransitive verbs require indirect objects' By definition, a transitive verb takes a direct object. An intransitive verb does not take a direct object. Unfortunately, this leaves us a little in doubt about which ones take indirect objects in Spanish. At this point, you've exhausted my expertise & will have to wait for a more knowledgable forero.

The first question: When we have a case with both direct object and indirect object, "se" need to be used. And the example you gave to me is simple and clear to see. My question is if "se" can be used to refer both person and things or it only can be used to refer person. Then in this kind of sentence, do we always put "se" which refers to person at the first position, then "lo" or "la" which refers to things follows?

A transitive verb takes a direct object.
Does this mean a transitive verb also can take an indirect object depending on the situations?

An intransitive verb does not take a direct object.
Does this mean the intransitive verb takes all the pronouces except direct - object pronounces?
Also this underlined sentence is hard to understand. I am not saying that the sentence is difficult to understand, but the meaning is very difficult to understand.

I am sorry about exhausting your expertise. But I am a "question boy". :D

Marco

updated NOV 25, 2008
posted by Marco-T
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Does "se" refer to "him"' Yes.

Do transitive verbs require direct objects and intransitive verbs require indirect objects' By definition, a transitive verb takes a direct object. An intransitive verb does not take a direct object. Unfortunately, this leaves us a little in doubt about which ones take indirect objects in Spanish. At this point, you've exhausted my expertise & will have to wait for a more knowledgable forero.

updated NOV 25, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Natasha said:

Marco, the lo/la/los/las are the direct object pronouns in Spanish, and le/les are the indirect object pronouns. No question about that. The problem (from an English-speaker's perspective) is to know which verbs require direct-object pronouns, and which require indirect-object pronouns. Here's one previous discussion about the subject:[url=http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A244209&page=1&commentId=1710195%3AComment%3A245337&x=1#1710195Comment245337]http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A244...[/url]If you have both an indirect object pronoun and a direct object pronoun, then it's not so bad. Le/les changes to se in this case:Se lo di. / I gave it to him.

Does "se" refer to "him"?

I think what you said is absolutely right. The point is to know which verbs require direct objects and which verbs require indirect objects. Is this point related to "transitive verbs" and "intransitive verbs"? Do transitive verbs require direct objects and intransitive verbs require indirect objects?

I have to get clear about this question in order to push my Spanish one level higher. :D

Marco

updated NOV 25, 2008
posted by Marco-T
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Marco, the lo/la/los/las are the direct object pronouns in Spanish, and le/les are the indirect object pronouns. No question about that. The problem (from an English-speaker's perspective) is to know which verbs require direct-object pronouns, and which require indirect-object pronouns. Here's one previous discussion about the subject:

[url=http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A244209&page=1&commentId=1710195%3AComment%3A245337&x=1#1710195Comment245337]http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A244209&page=1&commentId=1710195%3AComment%3A245337&x=1#1710195Comment245337[/url]

If you have both an indirect object pronoun and a direct object pronoun, then it's not so bad. Le/les changes to se in this case:

Se lo di. / I gave it to him.

updated NOV 25, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Natasha said:

Marco, I know for sure that people can be the direct object in Spanish. Search for "leísmo" on the forum and you´ll see more.

Hi Natasha,

I checked the dictionary for "leísmo". The dictionary told me that the meaning is "incorrect use of "le" as direct object instead of "lo". Does it mean "le" has to be used for indirect object? If you want to use direct object, you have to use "lo". Actually I am confused by the dictionary.

Would you please give me the explanation? (¿Por favor me darías la explicación')

Marco

updated NOV 25, 2008
posted by Marco-T
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Marco, I know for sure that people can be the direct object in Spanish. Search for "leísmo" on the forum and you´ll see more.

updated NOV 25, 2008
posted by Natasha
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lazarus1907 said:

Juan Garcia said:

"Que" is what, "lo" is it, "le" is it in masculine gender, "ya" is already.

Wrong!que = thatqué = what"lo" can be several things, and it is translated as "it" only in certain situations, so "it" is "lo" only sometimes."le" is not "it" in masculine gender at all.

Ahemd Abdooh said:

que=what( que tarabjas') what do you work'that( creemos que esta es la solución.) we believe that this is the solution. these are the basic meanings and there are many other meanings. when you go deeper in spanish, you will face them.

que = what, and your first sentence is wrong. It should be:¿En qué trabajas'In your "( i bought a car)=yo compre un coche or yo lo compre.", the correct translations would be "I may buy a car" and "I may buy it", if you don't write the accent on "compré".

the direct object( lo=los, la=las) means the object you work on. Almost it's not used to describe people; things(message, car, house,,,etc).
the indirect object( le=les) is used to describe people whom the verb is done to.

Hi lazarus,

Me gustaría saber si las dos explicaciones están correcto. He estado confundido por la diferencia entre "direct" y "indirect". Sus explicaciones estaría útil si están correcto.

Marco

updated NOV 25, 2008
posted by Marco-T
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Ok I watch 12 corazones an ponelape always says ya,ya,ya when the men repeat "vuelta"(turn around)for the 2nd time. In what sense does she mean there'

updated NOV 24, 2008
posted by LB
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LB said:

:

Ok like "ya" ya me voy is I'm going so the ya is already I'm going''?

That's the idea, but that doesn't sound right in English. "I'm leaving now" sounds better. See the dictionary, which gives this very example:

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/ya

Bottom line, you have to take context into account when translating.

updated NOV 24, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Ok like "ya" ya me voy is I'm going so the ya is already I'm going'''

updated NOV 24, 2008
posted by LB
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Hi Lazarus,
thanks for your correction.

sorry i forgot to mention é in que and compre...

yeah (compre) is the subjunctive of the simple present tense and (compré) is the indicative of simple past tense.

updated NOV 23, 2008
posted by Ahemd-Abdooh2
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Juan Garcia said:

"Que" is what, "lo" is it, "le" is it in masculine gender, "ya" is already.

Wrong!

que = that
qué = what

"lo" can be several things, and it is translated as "it" only in certain situations, so "it" is "lo" only sometimes.
"le" is not "it" in masculine gender at all.

Ahemd Abdooh said:

que=what( que tarabjas') what do you work? that( creemos que esta es la solución.) we believe that this is the solution. these are the basic meanings and there are many other meanings. when you go deeper in spanish, you will face them.

que = what, and your first sentence is wrong. It should be:

¿En qué trabajas?

In your "( i bought a car)=yo compre un coche or yo lo compre.", the correct translations would be "I may buy a car" and "I may buy it", if you don't write the accent on "compré".

updated NOV 23, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Juan Garcia said:

:

"le" is it in masculine gender
That's not right.

updated NOV 23, 2008
posted by Natasha
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que=what( que tarabjas') what do you work?
that( creemos que esta es la solución.) we believe that this is the solution.
these are the basic meanings and there are many other meanings. when you go deeper in spanish, you will face them.
'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''?

lo=direct masculine object; and la=direct feminine object.
example:
( i bought a car)=yo compre un coche or yo lo compre.
( i send a message to Juan)= yo envio a Juan la mensaje or yo lo envio a Juan.

the direct object( lo=los, la=las) means the object you work on. Almost it's not used to describe people; things(message, car, house,,,etc).
'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''?

le=indirect masculine or feminine object.
example:
(i love my mom)= yo quiero a mi madre or yo le quiero. also yo le amo.
( i send him a message)= yo le envio el mensaje.
( i give her my car)= yo le doy mi coche.
the indirect object( le=les) is used to describe people whom the verb is done to.
'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''?
ya= already

ya also has many uses. look for the dectionary,

i advise you to use this website's dictionary and www.wordreference.com dictionary

i hope it helps you

updated NOV 23, 2008
posted by Ahemd-Abdooh2