Te bajaron de la sierra a tamborasos

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i believe it a funny saying used in mexico,

is it used anywhere else? or does every native speaker get it?

if you have any funny saying in spanish please post it here and i would like to know where is it used mainly and where dd it come from'

7640 views
updated OCT 14, 2008
posted by PUNISHER

19 Answers

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heidi no te intiendes ni papa wink
stole that from ur thread,

Heidita said:

HI Punisher, I did not understand this saying. I don't know if regionally you can hear it in Spain.We have opened a new category, where I have moved this thread to: Proverbs, sayings etc.

>

updated OCT 14, 2008
posted by PUNISHER
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HI Punisher, I did not understand this saying. I don't know if regionally you can hear it in Spain.

We have opened a new category, where I have moved this thread to: Proverbs, sayings etc.

updated OCT 14, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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great informations so far, but still i would like to know if its used anywhere else?

and what is the story of it? and if i say it infront of any native speaker whould he get the funny part of it?

and if u guys and funny sayings please post them here

updated OCT 14, 2008
posted by PUNISHER
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James Santiago said:

The first meaning is used in futból to mean a header, right?

Right! (but not accent on "o" for "fútbol").

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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cabeza (head) - cabezazo (bump on the head)

I think it can be both active and passive.

dado con la cabeza: butt
recibido en la cabeza: blow on/to the head

The first meaning is used in futból to mean a header, right'

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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lazarus1907 said:

Natasha said:

James already told the answer, before the quiz.

Don't be harsh on me, it is not just a quiz. James explained the sentence, but didn't mention that -azo can actually be used with many words, and that's why "tamborazo" is not likely to appear in any dictionary.

I was just kidding around. That is very useful to know, actually. What was that about Baader-Meinhoff syndrome from the other day? I just heard the word "puñetazo" earlier -- and now here it is again!

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Natasha said:

James already told the answer, before the quiz.

Don't be harsh on me, it is not just a quiz. James explained the sentence, but didn't mention that -azo can actually be used with many words, and that's why "tamborazo" is not likely to appear in any dictionary.

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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lazarus1907 said:

Rob said:

que es tamborazos? "

The ending -azo has many uses, and one of them is to indicate an impact, blow, hit, bump,... where an object is involved:

pelota (ball) - pelotazo (fierce ball shot)

puño (fist) - puñetazo (fist punch)

martillo (hammer) - martillazo (hammer blow)

cabeza (head) - cabezazo (bump on the head)

botella (bottle) - botellazo (blow with a bottle)

Just guess the rest:

tambor (drum) - tamborazo

James already told the answer, before the quiz.

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Rob said:

que es tamborazos? "

The ending -azo has many uses, and one of them is to indicate an impact, blow, hit, bump,... where an object is involved:

pelota (ball) - pelotazo (fierce ball shot)
puño (fist) - puñetazo (fist punch)
martillo (hammer) - martillazo (hammer blow)
cabeza (head) - cabezazo (bump on the head)
botella (bottle) - botellazo (blow with a bottle)
codo (elbow) - codazo (nudge)

Just guess the rest:

tambor (drum) - tamborazo

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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In this case I believe tamborazo means drum-beat, so the phrase literally means "they came down from the mountains accompanied by drums." In American English we would say they are hillbillies. While the images are different, the sentiment is the same.

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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i think all of us are waiting for that guy on a white horse (from mexico) to show up and answer our questions

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by PUNISHER
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thanx for the correction smile

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by PUNISHER
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punisher said:

what the sentence means is like when u see a jungly person or people u say (the come down to you from jungle on the sound of drumps) excuse my bad explination if what i sayed dd not have the exact meaning

A further google search indicates that "tamborazo" is just a base drum, so you're probably on track.

By the way, not jungly person. Maybe: jungle-dweller, person from the jungle.

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by Natasha
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what the sentence means is like when u see a jungly person or people u say (the come down to you from jungle on the sound of drumps) excuse my bad explination if what i sayed dd not have the exact meaning

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by PUNISHER
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Hi Rob
I have never heard the phrase but Natasha has found that "in some places it is considered as a racist term against natives or indigenous people" and as such is also considered an unsociable and coarse saying.

updated OCT 13, 2008
posted by Eddy